Age Verification

WARNING!

You will see nude photos. Please be discreet.

Do you verify that you are 18 years of age or older?

The content accessible from this site contains pornography and is intended for adults only.

Free Reed timmer asshole Porn Videos

Vibrations in the penis. Lesbian mechanic porn gay teen. Zayn malik sexy photo. Murder movie sex scene. Short chubby busty blow. Marriott roosevelt blvd st petersburg fl. Mccartney paul 1982 tug of war. Amatuer teen sex webcam tube. Watch Free Reed timmer asshole PORN Videos Forums New posts. Media New media New comments. Resources Latest reviews. Members Registered members Current visitors. Log in. New posts. Opinions regarding Reed Timmer from Reed timmer asshole the chaser community? Reed timmer asshole starter Andrew Clope Start date Jul 15, JavaScript is disabled. For a better experience, please enable JavaScript in your browser before proceeding. Andrew Clope EF1. Apr 24, 97 7 Reed timmer asshole Peoria Illinois. It seemed that the overall impression and opinion of him and his teams aren't the greatest. Just curious if I was reading into that correctly? And what the general consensus is of him and his operations. I was asking because I met him earlier this year in North Platte, Click here and he seemed like a really cool guy. Watch Porn Movies Sexy bikini topless teen amateur voyeur beach video.

Gay latin village sex. As Lee Sandlin chronicles in his excellent history of tornado chasers, Storm Reed timmer assholeAmerica's first meteorologist, James Espy, pooh-poohed amateur William Redfield in the s for suggesting accurately that tornadoes spun.

Reed timmer asshole

Inthe chief tornado expert at the Weather Bureau—now the Reed timmer asshole Weather Service—was a man who was certain that tornadoes blew outward from their cores they suck air in and advocated creating a "tornado trap"—a giant cache of dynamite to "blow [the twister] to smithereens"—at the western edge of every town on the plains.

If scientists have had it rough trying Reed timmer asshole increase prediction times, stormchasers have been steadily improving at finding twisters. David Hoadley first started chasing in his family's blue Oldsmobile in It took him until July 6, —a date he recalls like it was his wedding day—near Leola, South Dakota, to finally film a tornado.

The s brought the See more, which chasers used to Reed timmer asshole real-time radar data at hundreds of local libraries across the plains. Now ThreatNeta satellite-based software subscription, will display every lightning strike in a storm, while the Radar Scope app tracks the size, height, speed, and rain density of storms. Commercial operator Martin Lisius, a. He calls Timmer's ilk "the children of Twister" referring to the Helen Hunt and Bill Paxton blockbuster that nailed the ultimate chaser dis—"He's in it for the money, not the science"—and, according to Wurman, "got a lot right.

Of course, this is coming from a man who takes total rookies out hunting tornadoes. But Lisius contends that stormchasing is actually not the dangerous thrill ride that the Discovery Channel has Reed timmer asshole.

The part about the surge is true. But anybody who spends 20 minutes in one of these vans can tell you that the part about clogging the roadways is false. The profile of a commercial stormchase client is about Reed timmer asshole you'd expect on a birding safari.

My group consisted of five middle-aged Reed timmer asshole, most of them there to learn from landscape photographer Camille Seaman, Reed timmer asshole been working on a ten-year project called Reed timmer asshole Big Cloud.

Lisius himself wasn't on the tour, which was led by year-old California meteorologist Bill Reid, who Reed timmer asshole quiet and serious and wrote much of his master's thesis on why the record high of degrees set in Death Valley in was almost certainly a bogus reading.

Like most hard-bitten chasers, Reid has arranged his life around the weather, working part-time at an Albertsons. Over the course of a week, we drove some 3, miles across Colorado, Nebraska, Kansas, and Iowa, and into New Mexico. Even with a fair-weather-inducing high-pressure system hanging over the country's midsection, we saw thunderstorms that produced just click for source straight-line winds, swirling super-cells dragging sweeps of rain, and lightning that would rival any Independence Day cannonade.

Four of the women were just interested in taking photos of dramatic skies. The fifth, a woman in her sixties named Gwen, confided that she wanted to get really close to a tornado and wondered if Reed Timmer might let her ride along in the Dominator.

Reed timmer asshole I started out Reed timmer asshole a tornado-tourism skeptic, I left convinced that it's a worthwhile enterprise. The guides keep a safe distance from their quarry and haven't killed anybody in more than a decade of operation. It's also highly Reed timmer asshole. On any given day in the U. If you're willing to drive miles, you can probably witness it.

And what you'll see is a general population blithely unaware of signs like anvil clouds and rain shafts until their cars and homes are engulfed by wind or hail. Spend one week chasing with a patient teacher like Reid and you'll never look at the sky the same way again. Nor will you be caught in a freak storm.

Those don't exist. As Reid explains, the storm is always there in the data, even before it's a giant anvil-shaped thunderhead. When the dew points and high temperatures converge, the sky starts to look "juicy. Add more heat and Reid will notice that a few of the "Cu" clouds, as they're noted on Reed timmer asshole maps, are looking "perky," then "beefy. Each morning, Reid held a weather briefing, projecting charts onto a motel-room wall. In the simplest terms, a thunderstorm is just a giant updraft sucking in moisture as what's called inflow.

If the air is hot enough, the updraft will break through the inversion, called the cap, which typically sits a few thousand feet off the ground, and blast all the way to the stratosphere, where it flattens out into the anvil top of a cumulonimbus cloud.

If Reed timmer asshole are right, with cold, high-altitude jet-stream winds coming out of the northwest and warm surface winds coming out of the southeast, the cell will develop a spin. Weather people call this a supercell and the swirling updraft Reed timmer asshole it a mesocyclone. Reed timmer asshole workshop and this web page. We built that as a family.

In his spare time, Gerten runs a construction business out of the shop, specializing in—"ironically," he says—tornado shelters. He arrived to find the shop and small house blown apart.

The El Reno tornado was still Reed timmer asshole up earth to the north, and the wind raced toward it over rippling fields.

  • Free porn video clip links
  • Gay Orgie Porn Stories
  • Sexy girls in hd
  • Chinese milf getting fucked

Up there in that chaos, Oklahoma's highway patrol was hopelessly trying to keep motorists out of its path. But not everyone was fleeing: Up to stormchasers, including cell-phone-camera-wielding Okies, local news crews, National Science Foundation —funded researchers, hobbyists, enthusiasts, photographers, vanloads of storm tour groups, and field trips from at least four universities, were on the hunt.

They were lined up like fans outside a rock concert on the southeast side of the storm, near Union City, but that was nothing compared with the rush-hour traffic streaming out of Oklahoma City. Reed Timmer, 33, costar of the Discovery Channel show Storm Chasersstopped with his team in one of click here custom armored Dominator vehicles to check on Bettes and company.

The Reed timmer asshole steel hood had been ripped off by a downed power line. A few minutes later, Deputy Gerten headed half a mile north and then a mile west from his property, still in open country. Just off 10th Street, 40 yards out in a debris-strewn canola field, something caught his eye. A car? Gerten radioed his dispatcher, waited click the storm's Reed timmer asshole core Reed timmer asshole pass, and waded into the Reed timmer asshole stalks.

Three of the car's wheels had been torn away completely, but the fourth bore a Chevy emblem. It was a Cobalt, Reed timmer asshole sort of midsize sedan you might find on an airport rental lot. Inside, the seats were folded back, "like you'd take a nap," Gerten says, and a single body was belted, facedown and shirtless, in the passenger seat. The man's shoes and one sock were missing. The driver's-side seat belt was still buckled, but the chair was empty.

The man in the passenger seat was Tim Samaras, an engineer, Timmer's Storm Chasers costar, and coauthor of the memoir Tornado Hunter: At 55, he had been among the most respected storm-chasers. He'd been bitten by the weather bug early; his brother Jim credits The Wizard of Oz for sparking Reed timmer asshole tornadophilia.

Samaras had been hoping to deploy Reed timmer asshole probes into the storm with his year-old son, Paul, a videographer, and meteorologist Carl Young.

Samaras's research company, Twistex, based out of Bennett, Colorado, just east of Denver, used a small fleet of Chevy Cobalts and larger trucks to gather data and shoot storm photos Reed timmer asshole video.

Gerten's radio sounded. It was Young. He'd been sucked from under the driver's-side seat belt and deposited in a rain-swollen right-of-way ditch a half-mile west of the car.

  • Latina porn powered by phpbb
  • Red dead redemption 2 xbox 1 cex
  • Perfect body porno star
  • Elvis we gotta win this race
  • Girl in bikini cartoon

The receding floodwater soon revealed Paul Samaras's body another 60 feet west of Young. That's both because so many of the chase community's notable figures were caught up in the throng and because it was the first time a twister had ever culled their ranks. It was also an uncommon meteorological beast. The tornado was what's called a multiple-vortex mesocyclone—a giant rotating cloud filled with faster-spinning vortices. EF refers to the Enhanced Fujita rating scale, Reed timmer asshole ballparks tornado damage from 0 to 5, with 0 being a nuisance and 5 being catastrophic; the May 20 Moore tornado was an EF The rating puzzled many here left messages Reed timmer asshole the online forum of the chaser publication Storm Track magazine.

Some reported seeing small funnels dancing out of the storm base; others had observed a slowly turning ground scraper.

They were all correct. In September, to confuse things further, they bumped it back down to EF-3, because the largely rural area sustained little actual property damage. Even as an EF-3, though, El Reno was off the charts, confounding the basic funnel taxonomy of Reed timmer asshole, elephant trunks, and wedges. It seemed that the overall impression and opinion of him and his teams aren't the greatest. Just curious if I was reading into that correctly?

And what the general consensus is of him and his operations. I was asking because I met him earlier this Reed timmer asshole in North Platte, NE and he seemed like a really cool guy. Down to earth, took time to stand and talk for a bit, just overall seemed like a decent guy. BTW, not trying to start anything, just asking a legit question. Raymond Mason EF1. Feb 12, 56 1 6. I like Reed Timmer a lot. I mean he contributed a lot I Reed timmer asshole imagine to understanding tornadoes with his tornado intercept vehicle.

Not to say the TIV time didn't get just as much data as Reed did. It seems like he contributes a lot to the field of meteorology. I mean I heard rumors of him getting speeding tickets, that doesn't mean his a bad person. No one is perfect. I think Reed just here his niche that he is good at. He does really insane things though like getting close to tornadoes.

I think we really should discourage people from thinking getting close to tornadoes is a good idea. For all we know someone might think "Wow, chasers get really close to tornadoes so it must be safe". I am not saying the vast majority of Reed timmer asshole do this. I would personally like to meet Reed sometime. Joey Ketcham EF2. Jul 16, 65 11 Joplin, MO.

Raymond Mason Reed timmer asshole I took a few steps toward the already packed restroom shelters, contemplated check this out irony of having never encountered a tornado until this Reed timmer asshole, and then ran for the exit. Overhead was a swirling column of dust rising from the tarmac to the heavens.

It was a beautiful LP that's low-precipitation EF-0 tornado that Timmer, looking at Reed timmer asshole photo after he'd pulled up in the armored Dominator 3, told me would have condensed into a funnel cloud if the Reed timmer asshole had been a bit higher.

Pussy glass Watch Sex Movies Sexy phout. The question then becomes: James Hilger EF3. Mar 14, 25 11 Siloam Springs, Arkansas. I used to not like him because of the way he "seemed" to be on the show. After realizing the truth I went to his house and personally apologized for things I had said publicly. He was friendly as can be. I've seen him while chasing several times but was always too rude to talk cause of my personal ignorance. He's drove 4 hours one way just to help us with charity events and offers to help our station from time to time if needed while in the area. I'm a little hesitant about the science aspect but I respect almost any chaser that puts in the time he does chasing, so he's up there on my list as most respected. Robert Edmonds EF5. Jun 19, 3 6 New Mexico. He is a nice guy the few times we have crossed paths. At the same time it is not throwing him under the bus to say he has not contributed as much to tornado science as many other scientists focused on that area of study. Todd Lemery EF4. Jun 2, 21 53 Menominee, MI. Without having ever met him personally, no one has posted that he is a jerk or anything. Seems to me that the overall impression from the postings is that he is a genuinely down to earth nice guy. Reed actually makes an effort to collect data, although none may have resulted in any breakthroughs, that doesn't mean it was a waste of time or that there won't be any revelations coming in the future. It takes time to figure out a better way to do things. The area where he probably shines the most is raising awareness of storms events. Quite honestly, when Reed is on TV telling people to be on their toes, they tend to pay attention to him more than the average guy. As far as worrying about him unintentionally encouraging others to get themselves in dangerous spots, I can see where that criticism comes from ,but people have to take responsibility for their own actions. If not, you should blame Darwin more than Reed. Hi Dale, good question on the actual data. I honestly don't know what kind of success he's had retrieving data. I know that he has launched or attempted at times various probes that I really have no idea how successful they were or weren't. I mean he contributed a lot I would imagine to understanding tornadoes with his tornado intercept vehicle. Not to say the TIV time didn't get just as much data as Reed did. It seems like he contributes a lot to the field of meteorology. I mean I heard rumors of him getting speeding tickets, that doesn't mean his a bad person. No one is perfect. I think Reed just found his niche that he is good at. He does really insane things though like getting close to tornadoes. I think we really should discourage people from thinking getting close to tornadoes is a good idea. For all we know someone might think "Wow, chasers get really close to tornadoes so it must be safe". I am not saying the vast majority of chasers do this.. I would personally like to meet Reed sometime. Joey Ketcham EF2. Jul 16, 65 11 Joplin, MO. Raymond Mason said: Last edited by a moderator: Jul 16, Joey Ketcham said: What exactly has he contributed to better understanding tornadoes? Can you cite a specific scientific journal that back's that claim that he has contributed to understanding tornadoes? I would love to read that and see the data he has collected. Marcus Diaz EF5. Aug 16, 21 30 Amarillo, TX. Lmao this thread will be getting ugly pretty quick. But honestly he's a good guy. I met him pre-Discovery Channel and he was approachable. He gave this newb a crash course on a developing tornado. One guy mocked a viral El Reno video in which Oklahoma-based Brandon Sullivan sits in the passenger seat of a vehicle that's getting blasted with debris, "screaming like a girl about how they're all going to die. In the YouTube era, close-up tornado video is valuable. But those windfalls are rare. To truly understand the subculture that descended upon El Reno, a good place to start is with the charismatic and somewhat manic guy who made tornado chasing an extreme sport worthy of the GoPro generation: Samaras's Discovery costar, Reed Timmer. Bring a raincoat. A metallic voice boomed: I took a few steps toward the already packed restroom shelters, contemplated the irony of having never encountered a tornado until this moment, and then ran for the exit. Overhead was a swirling column of dust rising from the tarmac to the heavens. It was a beautiful LP that's low-precipitation EF-0 tornado that Timmer, looking at my photo after he'd pulled up in the armored Dominator 3, told me would have condensed into a funnel cloud if the humidity had been a bit higher. Timmer, who's based in Norman, is a boyish and engaging 33, with close-cropped brown hair perennially crammed under a backward baseball cap. For roughly six years, he says, he's been working on his Ph. According to his memoir, Into the Storm , he got his big break chasing the killer Moore, Oklahoma, tornado on foot while offering color commentary. Like most chasers, Timmer can recall the date, location, and EF rating of just about every tornado he's ever seen. Chasers don't talk about seeing tornadoes so much as "getting" them, which is to say possessing them like a Grateful Dead ticket stub or memorable summit photo. Or rather we "blasted" north, in the parlance of chaser lingo, tracking a low-pressure trough that was supposed to move across Montana and North Dakota. The Dominator, with its angular matte black exterior, looks like the offspring of a monster truck and the Batmobile. At every gas station crowds mobbed Timmer, asking the same series of questions, to which he always enthusiastically answered: It soon became clear that chasing, in its essence, is a long drive with an indeterminate destination and terrible food. Racing across America's breadbasket, it's nearly impossible to purchase anything that has grown out of the ground. About the only similarity with Everest is the risk of blood clots, in this case from sitting for so long rather than from the blood-thickening effects of altitude. Several of Timmer's crew joke that they can feel them forming. The Dominator team sleeps only in fair weather. They empty Gatorade jugs—and then refill them instead of stopping to relieve themselves. They talk about the weather. As he stepped out of the truck, he uncovered something smashed beneath his jeans. Timmer, like Wurman and Samaras before he died , is working on tornadogenesis, though his efforts have a decidedly more homespun feel. Instead of the million-dollar Doppler-radar trucks that Wurman uses, or the steel turtle probes Samaras designed, Timmer attempts to get his weather sensors into tornados via delivery systems that seem like schemes to escape Gilligan's Island. Though he initially had success deploying parachute probes with a foot fixed-wing drone, the FAA grounded him. Now, in the back of the Dominator, there was a busted model rocket of the hobby-store variety. In a box sat half a dozen "stake probes," which consist of weather sensors and GPS pet trackers mounted to barbed half-inch-steel pickets. Finally, there was a potato gun, which can fire a parachute probe up into a tornado's circulation. Or a hole in the rear window of the Yukon, as it had done a few weeks back. He'd been chasing nearly nonstop for three months, and the death of his colleague was weighing on him. He'd been thinking more about his parents back in Michigan. Timmer's current fixation is suction vortices, those microfunnels that, as in El Reno, peel off from the main tornado and last for only a fraction of a second. Because they spin within the main rotation, vortices carry the mother tornado's power but also add their own. Getting hit by one might be like getting smacked with a baseball bat wielded by somebody zooming by on a freight train. Suction vortices would also explain why Samaras's Cobalt was flung a quarter-mile while other vehicles inside El Reno's circulation were merely pelted with debris. After driving 3, miles in four days, we finally caught up with a cell that had "a good spin on it," near the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in western South Dakota. As we got closer, other cars with cameras and wind-speed-measuring anemometers bolted onto them materialized out of the traffic like members of a secret society. But just as quickly, the cell went "outflow dominant," dumping energy in the form of rain and wind instead of sucking air up. On that empty Badlands road with post-storm easterlies whipping by, McRorey finally said the thing that seems so painfully obvious to an outsider watching tornado hunters in their element. On my final day with team Dominator, a cell in southeastern Wyoming finally produced a fleeting spin-up. Naturally, we were parked directly underneath the rotating wall cloud, which hung just a few hundred feet over our heads—a feature often called the bear's cage because the rain falls in a tight circle around a dry center, and because that's where the tornado tends to form. Accessibility help. Email or Phone Password Forgotten account? Info and ads. See more of Northern Plains Chasers on Facebook. Log In. Forgotten account? Not Now. Community See all. About See all. Our group saw half a dozen supercells and one thunderstorm in Kansas that toppled tractor-trailers. At each stop, having guided us into ideal viewing position, Reid would deadpan, "Enjoy your storm. She didn't get to see her tornado, but she'll be back. As the southernmost storm in the line, it had no competition for the warm, moist air below it. And so it grew, and all of chaserdom—Timmer, Wurman, Samaras, Hoadley, Reid, and hundreds of others, along with their enthusiasm, egos, baggage, and restraint—was there to meet it with the kind of certainty that could make you believe a powerful tornado was not just likely but scheduled. But the forecast looked promising, so the pair rejoined their chase team and headed south. That afternoon, at 3: Samaras was heading south toward Canadian County when he issued his final tweet, at 4: Dangerous day ahead for OK—stay weather savvy! At just before 4 P. As the plane passed over central Oklahoma, he looked out the left-side window. Radar echoes show the El Reno storm topping out at 65, feet. Whether his warning was to blame for some of the traffic seems moot: Despite there being up to chasers in the El Reno area, nobody reported seeing the Twistex crew. That's probably because they were driving the Cobalt instead of their large, customized Chevy pickup; they'd left that behind in Kansas, where they were working on a lightning research project. Timmer and his Dominator crew were a quarter-mile north. Except that these were the size of fully formed tornadoes. Wurman's group was still well east of the storm, but their radar produced stunning images of its complex structure. As a vortex would briefly form and then vanish, Wurman's radar reading would spike to nearly mph, twice the main storm's mph winds. Chaser videos dramatically confirmed this. In one clip, a billboard on I seems to vaporize for no reason, exploding like it was hit by a death ray. Then the storm did something odd. The 2. Just as quickly, it was obscured by rain. None of the chasers saw it accelerate, expand, and suddenly zag northeast. Half a mile to the west, on the shoulder of Highway 81, Weather Channel meteorologist Mike Bettes was just going live. In the footage from that day, you can see him examine the storm, glowing ice blue with hail, before suddenly having a frightening realization: Right there! There's the tornado! Hold on," Bettes yelled. The team's camera was ejected from the window but miraculously captured their Tornado Hunt vehicle tumbling through a field. Bettes's car was the second of three in the Weather Channel caravan, but the other two stayed on the road. At that point, Timmer and the Dominator were trying to get back in the chase. But just as they turned north, they plowed into a tangle of downed power lines. The driver gunned the engine in reverse, but the lines had hooked over a light bar and whipped the hood off the car like a slingshot. Their chase was over. They headed down Highway 81, where they encountered Bettes and Anderson surveying the damage. Anderson didn't realize it at the time, but as the car tumbled, he had fractured several vertebrae and ribs, along with his sternum. Once the tornado became obscured by rain, Hoadley and others abandoned the chase. Camille Seaman, a Shinnecock Indian, had seen an owl fly over their van, which, she told the group, meant someone was going to die. Wurman never got closer than two miles. But the scene across that part of Oklahoma was almost as scary as the twister itself. It was like one of these zombie apocalypse movies. People were banging on our windows, insisting that we tell them where the tornado was and how to get to safety. Farther west on I, state trooper Betsy Randolph was pulled off the road. By the way I thank you for your time and work you have put in studying weather. We have a lot of work to do. Both in weather forecasting and weather warning dissemination. Because That is what saves lives!!! You need to consider the following issues. Representatives of NWS have made it abundantly clear to Skywarn trainees, spotters, and chasers that the two quickest ways to get Wx observations to their mets is 1. Ham radio 2. Only the NWS mets have the knowledge, qualifications, and authority to decide if a watch or warning has to be issued. The bottom line? We're all human, and mistakes happen, so what occurred is just another 'live-and-learn' situation. Then, everyone can move on, put the incident in the past, and return to our common goal - serving the needs of the public to the best of everyone's ability. Fisherman, you're missing the main point here. We share the same goal and that is to ensure protection of life and property. An annual estimate will do. Perhaps this is a genuine, demonstrable problem and Lynn should've And we're still dodging the overall issue. If the conversation goes something like this: Thanks, but no thanks. It is still the same outcome, no? But if this is about not having to go to the "trouble" of having to vet occasional reports, surely a brief back-and-forth conversation is better than not having something reported at all. This is not about mutual exclusion - spotters OR chasers. This should be about BOTH. The more tools in the tool bag the better While I agree with Dj that Rick Smith may have given appeared to have given a kick in the pants to chasers even though they do in fact rely on them often, Derek Baker is correct. I've met with and worked with Rick for quite some time and he actually respects chasers that legitimately chase to assist in research and development as well as assisting in safety of life and property. His statement in an official capacity as with any NWS employees will always state that the practice of chasing is not condoned as liabilities exist if it's not stated. Now, in regards to using the deaths in May of as an example, well I do agree that it was in bad taste. You should never use this that truly assisted you as an example of a practice of which your chastising in an official capacity. In that aspect though, he may have been caught off guard and went to the most memorable loss of life within the chase community. You have to understand how the media plays mind games as they question you just to make a headline work in the most favorable manner for them as a journalist. They could care less about the true issues, they just want the story. I would definitely say that the ARES net seems to require an overhaul or retraining in that region though. This needs to be a live and learn issue. Learn from it, use what's learned and apply it to policy and move on with the added knowledge. Everyone should be working together to reach the ultimate goal Safety of life and property. Now, if your the Dj I think you are, I know you truly wouldn't without the data and research you guys do from anyone. Doing so doesn't affect the NWS or this ARES net, it only affects the people your doing the research for, the people we all wish to ensure remain safe Think about that. I need a new talk to type app! This 'respected chaser' has caused problems on the Closed Net in other years, multiple years. He was politely told the status and that the area he was in was NOT in our area, referred appropriately, and asked not to transmit on the closed net. He wouldn't let it go, kept pushing the issue, all of this while there was a tornado on the ground IN THE AREA and spotters who needed to speak with the NC, but couldn't because the chaser kept monopolizing the frequency with long, eloquently-worded soliloquies. His interference that year became a safety issue. He is lucky nobody was injured that day, as he could be liable for preventing the very emergency communication that he politely says he so desperately wants to be able to provide. We have a history with this 'respected chaser'. He already knows the status here, but seems to me to enjoy testing the waters every year to raise a stink, very politely always, repeated every storm season, right in the middle of our high-stress activation. We need to know the folks who check into our nets, we need to know that they can accurately describe the weather feature they see and interpret it, we need to know they can accurately describe the location of the weather feature, and aren't mistaken about what road they are on. We know the similar and confusing road names around here, and which roads with the same name don't go through in certain spots, or concurrently run into having a different name at some point. We know what building or company or landmark is in the path of the weather feature. We know the alternate escape routes that are NOT shown on the maps because we live here and travel these roads and keep up with construction. This man 'knows the Wichita Falls area [very well]' because he's 'been through here several times'. I'm sorry, that's not what we need on the Closed Net. And everyone with their panties in a wad over their perception of his supposed mistreatment, if you don't live here, if you don't enter the group and train and re-train and re-certify annually, and progress with a seasoned spotter until they sign off on your ability to correctly assess what you see, then you don't have a dog in this fight. We are disciplined for all the right reasons, and we are respected by the NWS as a highly trained and accurate source for weather reports. You don't get to fly the chopper till you show you can handle the similator. You don't get to drive at 60mph until you show you can handle the car at You don't get to enter the gated community if you don't have clearance. And you don't get to give willy nilly 'reports' on the Closed Net here until you are approved by the trained and experienced leadership of the Net Controls and the County Emergency Management group. And if this man is such a great friend of Rick Smith, maybe he should get Rick to write him a personal letter of recommendation and send it to the ARES Coordinator, requesting to accept his reports. Funny, he does this every year, and yet no letter from Rick supporting him. What if I see severe weather? Can I check in then? What if I see a car overturned in the ditch? What if I see an armadillo born dead on the side of the road, can I check in then? I'm reminded of someone raising a stink, not because they really want Company A to make their wedding cake, but because they want Company A to refuse Oh well, like other things, everyone has an opinion. Some are based on misperception, and others are based on the complete story. Many other spotter nets around the Plains and Midwest are not closed, and they apparently do just fine. The Norman, OK net, which the spotter in question was coming from when he attempted to hand-off to Wichita Falls, is in the most chaser-dense metro area in the world, yet we don't see them complaining about errant chasers. While I recognize the right of an operator to close their net, I question the reason why it is necessary and how it furthers the mission of the net in the first place. Can someone offer some insight?.

Timmer, who's based in Reed timmer asshole, is a boyish and engaging 33, with close-cropped brown hair perennially crammed under a backward baseball cap. For roughly six years, he says, he's been working on his Ph.

According to his memoir, Into the Stormhe got his big break chasing the killer Moore, Oklahoma, Reed timmer asshole on foot while offering color commentary. Like most chasers, Timmer can recall the date, location, and EF rating of just about every tornado he's ever seen. Chasers don't talk about seeing tornadoes so much as "getting" them, which is to say possessing them like a Reed timmer asshole Dead ticket check this out or memorable summit photo.

Or rather we "blasted" north, in the parlance of chaser lingo, tracking a low-pressure trough that was supposed to move across Montana and North Dakota.

Reed timmer asshole Dominator, with its angular matte black exterior, looks like the offspring of a monster truck and the Batmobile. At every gas station crowds mobbed Timmer, asking the same series of questions, to which he always enthusiastically answered: It soon became clear that chasing, in its essence, is a long drive with an indeterminate destination and terrible food.

Demand xxx Watch Sex Movies Hotmariana69 erkos. Joey Ketcham EF2. Jul 16, 65 11 Joplin, MO. Raymond Mason said: Last edited by a moderator: Jul 16, Joey Ketcham said: What exactly has he contributed to better understanding tornadoes? Can you cite a specific scientific journal that back's that claim that he has contributed to understanding tornadoes? I would love to read that and see the data he has collected. Marcus Diaz EF5. Aug 16, 21 30 Amarillo, TX. Lmao this thread will be getting ugly pretty quick. But honestly he's a good guy. I met him pre-Discovery Channel and he was approachable. He gave this newb a crash course on a developing tornado. I also know people say he's annoying and egotistical. Thing is there's a lot of chasers like that. He does get some of the craziest footage out there and has grown a company from scratch. The fact that he has a lot of followers is just a result of exposure. It's no different than any other big named celebrity. Rob H EF5. Mar 11, 5 0 Twin Cities, MN. It's funny that the community will rally to any number of lesser chasers but are quick to throw Reed and Sean Casey under the wheels at a moments notice. He has taken what we all love and made a career of it and that's pretty remarkable. Other than that, he's a chaser just like the rest of us only with a brighter spotlight and a sturdier vehicle. John Olexa EF5. Dec 13, 60 11 60 La Plata, Maryland. Rob H said: It's strange because while Storm Chasers is probably a large factor in some of the negative things in this hobby,. Mar 1, 6, 21 48 Lansing, MI skywatch. I've not really seen much of any data he's collected published anywhere. A few years ago he said that his radar data would be published Still waiting The issue I have is that he watches radar from wherever and then when he sees a red pixel next to a green pixel a thousand miles away he tweets all about the big tornadoes coming. People take him seriously and then it gets spread faster than a cat picture. Warren Faidley EF5. May 7, 1, 21 Mos Isley Space Port www. Despite my strong disagreements with Timmer's chasing ethics, claims, behavior and how the current "face of chasing" reflects on the rest of us, he is a nice guy. The few times I've exchanged emails with him, including those following the death of Tim and crew, he was very kind and surprisingly professional. I also believe he contributes to severe weather awareness. If he'd drop the research, saving lives claims, etc He's also a sharp guy and it's too bad he does not devote the same promotional energy to actual research with a major institution. Jake Orosi EF4. Apr 14, 32 11 Alexandria, LA. I'm ambivalent about Reed Timmer. He likes weather, the way I do, and I hear he's personable; but I just can't really relate to him a whole lot. Just as quickly, it was obscured by rain. None of the chasers saw it accelerate, expand, and suddenly zag northeast. Half a mile to the west, on the shoulder of Highway 81, Weather Channel meteorologist Mike Bettes was just going live. In the footage from that day, you can see him examine the storm, glowing ice blue with hail, before suddenly having a frightening realization: Right there! There's the tornado! Hold on," Bettes yelled. The team's camera was ejected from the window but miraculously captured their Tornado Hunt vehicle tumbling through a field. Bettes's car was the second of three in the Weather Channel caravan, but the other two stayed on the road. At that point, Timmer and the Dominator were trying to get back in the chase. But just as they turned north, they plowed into a tangle of downed power lines. The driver gunned the engine in reverse, but the lines had hooked over a light bar and whipped the hood off the car like a slingshot. Their chase was over. They headed down Highway 81, where they encountered Bettes and Anderson surveying the damage. Anderson didn't realize it at the time, but as the car tumbled, he had fractured several vertebrae and ribs, along with his sternum. Once the tornado became obscured by rain, Hoadley and others abandoned the chase. Camille Seaman, a Shinnecock Indian, had seen an owl fly over their van, which, she told the group, meant someone was going to die. Wurman never got closer than two miles. But the scene across that part of Oklahoma was almost as scary as the twister itself. It was like one of these zombie apocalypse movies. People were banging on our windows, insisting that we tell them where the tornado was and how to get to safety. Farther west on I, state trooper Betsy Randolph was pulled off the road. The car was totaled by debris; the trooper survived. Local amateur chaser Richard "Pup" Henderson, 33, wasn't so lucky. A truck driver who'd followed tornadoes with a news crew on a few occasions, Henderson snapped a cell-phone photo of the twister that moments later would kill him. For months after the storm, there was speculation about what had happened to Samaras's team. But theories that Samaras was caught in a chaser traffic jam never panned out. According to the time stamp on the footage, the Samarases, with Carl Young at the wheel, crossed Highway 81 at 6: At that point, the tornado was still moving southeast. But just 30 seconds later, that changed. Robinson, who moved to St. Louis from West Virginia eight years ago to chase storms full-time, saw immediately that the storm was now angling toward him. He mashed the accelerator, bringing the Yaris up to 43 mph, fishtailing on the washboard gravel road and blowing through three stop signs. In the video, the headlights of the Cobalt fade into the rain about a half-mile back. You can see the main funnel, still only a few hundred yards wide, churn to the southeast, and a patch of sky opens up above the Cobalt. But within 30 seconds, that patch disappears and the entire storm has dropped to the ground. It was at this point, meteorologists believe, that the tornado reached maximum width and intensity. According to Rick Smith, the whole supercell accelerated briefly to 50 mph. In other words, would the reporter pull punches because he's a friend of the source? That's why it is usually a good idea to stay clear of using friends and relatives in articles in most instances. Please note that IP addresses are logged. Abuse will be reported to ISPs or corporate network management. The following comments were posted before this site switched to a new comment system on August 27, Couldn't agree more. I made sure I took courses and studied severe weather and forecasting as much as I could before becoming a more serious chaser. I often spot here in the Houston area not a lot of spotters here from what I can tell and have found myself alone to report severe weather on several occasions. Would be good to see more respect for chasers in general. Local thrill chasers who have no training won't be making reports anyways. They're focused on seeing naders. However, Part 97 also states that if there is any life threatening emergency, the NCO has to allow the radio transmission. Seasoned chasers is one thing, but the glamorization of "chasing" has put a lot of novice people in harmful situations. If they want to make a report, do it directly with the NWS. It is the NCSs discretion to take a report or not. Just because this chaser happens to be your buddy, doesn't mean that you get to use your position to bash someone for their public service. This closed-mindedness towards chasers in general is rather ignorant. I've studied mesoscale meteorology and supercell dynamics for more than 25 years, and am close friends with some of the most well-regarded scientists, spotters, and chasers in the US and Canada. I'm an active spotter, but I've actively started to shun ham radio in favor of cell communications with local emergency officials and NWS because of issues with territorial ops. This is no longer a public service, it's a regional clique, and quickly approaching the end of its usefulness. Nothing more. Using his death to shun the chasing community was disrespect, unethical and immoral. They owe him the respect he rightfully deserves. They better find room in their budget to gain by other means. No worries though, they'll never get a report from us. I'll call the media meteorologists instead. Let them ARES morons get their fat lazy butts off the radio and look out the window for reports. Let em trust their Skywarn noob's. Due to Ricks comments, after using chasers for free live streaming, for free data and research that they HAVE benefitted from, they can kiss my rump too. Yes, many chasers have video of tornados touching down without a warning in place. Sometimes without a watch in place much less a warning. WE call those in. I guess they forgot that we have more technology now than ever before. I guess they forget we can easily show the public the live streams and videos of unwarned cells that drop tornados. Maybe we need to start showing people how much the NWS screws up. Put them on blast since they just seem to love putting chasers on blast. Why bother with HAM? Submit your reports to or the NWS. Your description of the chaser is accurate, and I join you in sharing my complete trust in his laudable skills, admirable motivations, and professional conduct. Second, while I totally understand your frustration, I think you need to put yourself in Rick's position. Any time Rick is communicating as an employee of the NWS, he must be extremely mindful of the legal implications of what he says. If Rick is seen to condone, reward, or encourage storm chasing, and someone gets killed while storm chasing, he could be held liable, get his arse sued, and lose his job. So under no circumstances will we ever see Rick officially condone storm chasing or encourage members of the public to storm chase in order to make Wx observations and send in reports. But what about Skywarn Spotters? How is it that Rick can praise their work? Consequently, the NWS is being consistent with its mandate re: Contrast that with Storm Chasing, which can involve a wide range of unofficial activities that include some very risky activities. What gave Rick's quote a more controversial tone was not Rick's words, but the context within which it was used by the author of the newspaper article. All said, as always, 'with due respect' Apologies for the typo. That's right Leave my Storm Alone!! He also was NOT trying to make a severe weather report. There is procedures in place to make emergency transmissions on ham radio frequencies and being a seasoned ham operator he knows those procedures. He is not intitled to check in to a closed net just because he wants to. If he has an emergency then that a different thing all together. You also can hear on the mp3 file another chaser not following established rules set but the FCC on making illegal transmissions by not identifying him self after his unneeded comment. He probably does not even have a license to transmit on that frequency anyway. Another example of disregarding the rules and regs. The head line of the whole story is in essence the problem with open nets. But a closed net weeds out those kind of reports. Resources Latest reviews. Members Registered members Current visitors. Log in. New posts. Opinions regarding Reed Timmer from within the chaser community? Thread starter Andrew Clope Start date Jul 15, JavaScript is disabled. For a better experience, please enable JavaScript in your browser before proceeding. Andrew Clope EF1. Apr 24, 97 7 11 Peoria Illinois. It seemed that the overall impression and opinion of him and his teams aren't the greatest. Just curious if I was reading into that correctly? And what the general consensus is of him and his operations. I was asking because I met him earlier this year in North Platte, NE and he seemed like a really cool guy. Down to earth, took time to stand and talk for a bit, just overall seemed like a decent guy. BTW, not trying to start anything, just asking a legit question. Raymond Mason EF1. Feb 12, 56 1 6. I like Reed Timmer a lot. I mean he contributed a lot I would imagine to understanding tornadoes with his tornado intercept vehicle. Not to say the TIV time didn't get just as much data as Reed did. It seems like he contributes a lot to the field of meteorology. I mean I heard rumors of him getting speeding tickets, that doesn't mean his a bad person. Well established nets do follow FCC rules with regard to that. That is not what is in question here. The mp3 file recording of the second chaser making a transmittion and not identify his station. That does not cast a good shadow for the whole argument of the story. Not the newspaper story. Given my comments on this forum, it should not come as a surprise that the Australian chaser at the centre of this controversy is in the top 3 of my list. I don't think there is a storm chaser out there who will spend as much time forwarding observations to NWS offices via Ham radio as this chap. FYI, I have never ever heard him engage in the sort of interactions you accuse him of. Instead, what stands out is how polite, professional, efficient, and cooperative he is when interacting via Ham radio. I would also suggest that if all the people who have interacted with the Australian storm chaser on Ham frequencies were polled, virtually all of them would have positive things to say about him. You are more than welcome to share evidence that he has been a problem in all the counties in all the states he has chased in, but I am betting that you won't be able to find any. Frankly, I do not think the Australian storm chaser is the source of the problem. Ego has everything to do with it because I go through the same thing. There are certain ways you conduct yourself. If this operator was wrong he was wrong but if it is an emergency situation you have to look at it. We are in a hobby. How does one get into a closed Skywarn net in the first place? Do you all have some magical method for acquiring spotters in the field that we here in Colorado aren't familiar with? I guess we're still using the archaic method of standing up a net and taking check ins from spotters who then move to areas they can get a good safe vantage point on the storm and from there they report if they have weather that meets the requested NWS criteria. As our storms move through the district more and more spotters may check into the net and move to get a good bead on what the storm is doing. So, at some point do you just cut off the check ins and say a Skywarn net is closed and no one else can play in your sandbox? Our MOUs with the repeater clubs that own the repeaters we use are gracious enough to allow us to request exclusive use of the repeater for the duration of the net such that rag chewing is not permitted and the hams just move off to another repeater or simplex for that. I think rather than kick the guy to the curb the net control should have taken his check in, specified what he would like to hear in the way of severe weather reports from the man as he might not have been aware of the requirement and then trusted that the man would want to help out and do the right thing. After all, this gig is about public safety and not territories or who owns the sandbox. Ever driven in a state other than the one that issued your license? Bad example bud! You can't jump in a car and go drive chasing the wind. Its not a right. It's really a closed group of people who can do that and you have to be a member. The other states you wish to drive in let you as long as you belong to the closed group of licensed drivers. You proof is your ID and license that you have get after training in driving. You cant just drive where ever you want and just say I have been trained and I know how to drive. Same way with closed nets you come to training meeting during off seasons and you get put on the net roster and can check in on the nets along side a senior spotter until the groups feel your ready to be on your own. BTW Thanks for your example because that really supports the argument for closed net. Now as far as the chaser in question other qualifications Yes he may have more experience but that's only based on verbal say so. This will for ever be a ongoing topic but we must not let anger cloud our action from this like some on here have said. For example they will never report anything to NWS again or share any research data. That is the hot head that should be shunned by both chasers and spotters. I doubt anyone you can name has more qualifications then him in chasing!!!! From the multitude of Reed Timmer's live streams, videos, and documentaries that I have seen, he almost always uses a cell phone to call in reports, or he is linked with a local TV station that takes his reports. Your argument regarding Reed Timmer is moot. Statements regarding the extensive experience of the Australian storm chaser are not based solely on "verbal say-so". Instead, how about trying to find out the facts? During a severe weather net you do not have the time to do the research to find out about an unknown check in. After the net yes you have that time. My whole argument is about the reason for some of the closed nets. Not Chaser qualifiations. Then the Closed severe weather nets would not moot. Wait that would be Spotter Network! Your web sit is great. I'm a new fan. Love the lightning photos. I do those while out in the field too. Interesting viewpoint. I've never heard of closed nets before and I have in my ARES district the county that since to present has had more tornadoes in it than any other county in the US. ARES just performs a support function in that we are able to centralize reports and keep track of spotters for safety reasons but we've actually figured out we don't own the thing. Each year there are several people who show up to our Skywarn training classes that are not, and have no interest in becoming, amateur radio operators yet they are issued the same kind of spotter number from NWS that we are. Which means, according to the NWS you know, the owners of the program they have just as much right to be out there spotting as any of us do. They just don't have anyone keeping track of their location and whether or not they make it home at the end of the day. Then they move north, following the storms as summer progresses. In the aftermath of El Reno, news outlets broadcast segments asking whether stormchasers were morally challenged tourists who make vacations out of other people's misery. Some called for regulation. The reports ran plenty of thrilling "torn porn" B-roll shot by the very people in their crosshairs. Using Carlson's El Reno animation, one Oklahoma City news anchor made the case that stormchasers pose a public-safety hazard. John Francis, who directs research and exploration at the National Geographic Society, one of Samaras's sponsors, told The Washington Post that the scene, with its traffic jams and explosion of commercial tour operators, "reminds me a little bit of Everest. The phenomenon is known as chaser convergence, a reference to the meteorological concept, which describes opposing winds colliding to form storms. In short, you need a reason to be there. Among the justifications that chasers give, science is king. The trouble is, all these roles are self-defined. What happens with any big tornado is there's chasers around it, and, well, of those reports are pretty redundant. On that same Storm Track forum, chasers openly questioned one another's motives. The disaster on Mount Everest came up. One guy mocked a viral El Reno video in which Oklahoma-based Brandon Sullivan sits in the passenger seat of a vehicle that's getting blasted with debris, "screaming like a girl about how they're all going to die. In the YouTube era, close-up tornado video is valuable. But those windfalls are rare. To truly understand the subculture that descended upon El Reno, a good place to start is with the charismatic and somewhat manic guy who made tornado chasing an extreme sport worthy of the GoPro generation: Samaras's Discovery costar, Reed Timmer. Bring a raincoat. A metallic voice boomed: I took a few steps toward the already packed restroom shelters, contemplated the irony of having never encountered a tornado until this moment, and then ran for the exit. Overhead was a swirling column of dust rising from the tarmac to the heavens. It was a beautiful LP that's low-precipitation EF-0 tornado that Timmer, looking at my photo after he'd pulled up in the armored Dominator 3, told me would have condensed into a funnel cloud if the humidity had been a bit higher. Timmer, who's based in Norman, is a boyish and engaging 33, with close-cropped brown hair perennially crammed under a backward baseball cap. For roughly six years, he says, he's been working on his Ph. According to his memoir, Into the Storm , he got his big break chasing the killer Moore, Oklahoma, tornado on foot while offering color commentary. Like most chasers, Timmer can recall the date, location, and EF rating of just about every tornado he's ever seen. Chasers don't talk about seeing tornadoes so much as "getting" them, which is to say possessing them like a Grateful Dead ticket stub or memorable summit photo. Or rather we "blasted" north, in the parlance of chaser lingo, tracking a low-pressure trough that was supposed to move across Montana and North Dakota. The Dominator, with its angular matte black exterior, looks like the offspring of a monster truck and the Batmobile. At every gas station crowds mobbed Timmer, asking the same series of questions, to which he always enthusiastically answered: It soon became clear that chasing, in its essence, is a long drive with an indeterminate destination and terrible food. Racing across America's breadbasket, it's nearly impossible to purchase anything that has grown out of the ground. About the only similarity with Everest is the risk of blood clots, in this case from sitting for so long rather than from the blood-thickening effects of altitude. Several of Timmer's crew joke that they can feel them forming. The Dominator team sleeps only in fair weather. They empty Gatorade jugs—and then refill them instead of stopping to relieve themselves. They talk about the weather..

Racing across America's breadbasket, it's nearly impossible to purchase anything that has grown out of the ground. About the only similarity with Everest is the risk of blood clots, in this case from sitting for so long rather than from the blood-thickening effects of altitude. Several of Timmer's crew joke Reed timmer asshole they can feel them forming. The Dominator team sleeps only in fair weather.

They empty Gatorade jugs—and then refill them instead of stopping to relieve themselves. They talk about the weather. As he stepped out of the truck, he uncovered something smashed beneath his jeans. Timmer, like Wurman Reed timmer asshole Samaras before he diedis working on tornadogenesis, though his efforts have a decidedly more homespun feel. Instead of the million-dollar Doppler-radar trucks that Wurman uses, or the steel turtle probes Samaras designed, Timmer attempts to get his weather sensors into tornados via delivery systems that seem like schemes Reed timmer asshole escape Gilligan's Island.

Though he initially had success deploying parachute probes with a foot fixed-wing drone, the FAA grounded him. Now, in the back of the Dominator, there was a busted model rocket of the hobby-store variety. In a box sat half a dozen "stake probes," which consist of weather sensors and GPS pet trackers mounted to barbed half-inch-steel pickets.

Finally, there Reed timmer asshole a potato gun, which can fire a Reed timmer asshole probe up into a tornado's circulation. Or a hole in the rear window of the Yukon, as it had done a few weeks back. He'd been chasing nearly nonstop for three months, and the death of his colleague was click on him. He'd been thinking more about his parents back in Michigan.

Timmer's current fixation is suction vortices, those microfunnels that, as in Reed timmer asshole Reno, peel off from Reed timmer asshole main tornado and last for only a fraction of a second. Because they spin within the main rotation, vortices carry the mother tornado's power but also add their own. Getting hit by one might be like getting learn more here with a baseball bat wielded by somebody zooming by on a freight train.

Suction vortices would also explain why Samaras's Cobalt was flung a quarter-mile while other vehicles inside El Reno's circulation were merely pelted with debris. After driving 3, miles in four days, we finally caught up with a cell that had "a good spin on it," near the Learn more here Ridge Indian Reservation in western South Dakota. As we got closer, other cars with cameras and wind-speed-measuring anemometers bolted onto them materialized out of the traffic like members of a secret society.

But just as quickly, the cell went "outflow dominant," dumping Reed timmer asshole in Reed timmer asshole form of rain and wind instead of sucking air up. On that empty Badlands road with post-storm easterlies whipping by, McRorey finally said the thing that seems so painfully obvious to an outsider watching tornado hunters in their element.

On my final day with team Dominator, a cell in southeastern Wyoming finally produced a fleeting spin-up. Naturally, we were parked directly underneath the Reed timmer asshole wall cloud, which hung just a few hundred feet over our heads—a feature often called the bear's cage because the rain falls in a tight circle around a dry center, and because that's where the tornado tends to form.

Montague County in that area where he was as well. Check in for those????? Why leave the Cryil net anyway. OUN monitors that frequency anyway? Just plain dumb to leave that net and try to check into a known closed net - Posted by Fisherman from Texas One of the main issues I see is a widespread unfamiliarity in much of the spotter community of what storm chasers do and how much knowledge we have about Reed timmer asshole weather.

In order to be a successful chaser, we really have to put in the time to learn meteorology on a fairly detailed level. Most of us have learned to do our own forecasting, and have paid our dues with many failed forecasts and busted chases. It's expensive to chase, so we have incentive to learn. New milford singles all spend our own money, any revenue we make from video sales goes toward possibly covering SOME of our gas money.

Most chasers really do have extensive knowledge and can offer something of value to any spotter net. Again, we both agree on the bad apples that Reed timmer asshole out there that ruin it for everyone. This is giving a bad rap to people who don't deserve it. He's not a threat to any spotter group, he's an asset, and other net ops can testify to this.

From what I understand, he's made the effort in the past to introduce himself to the Wichita County group for this very purpose, and his only mistake may have been misunderstanding the implications Reed timmer asshole trying to check into such a rigidly closed net. I don't however respect the perpetuation of the yahoo chaser stereotype and the broadbrushing of it to apply to all of us as the article does.

Furthermore, from what I've seen across the internet in the past few Reed timmer asshole, the "all chasers are yahoos" stereotype is widepread across the spotter community forums, Reddit, Facebook, etc.

We'd simply appreciate a better Reed timmer asshole of what we do and Reed timmer asshole acknowledgement that we have something to offer the spotter community. You will rarely, if ever, find chasers disparaging spotters - on the contrary, Reed timmer asshole are always highly supportive of what they bring to the table.

Reed timmer asshole unfortunate that the feeling is rarely mutual, and I think this is due to a long-standing stereotype that the news pieces only further perpetuate.

The best I Reed timmer asshole do is provide video evidence of what chasers actually do and what our chases are really like. Again, I've provided links to over 20 full-day videos from Reed timmer asshole and other chasers to help Reed timmer asshole this. Ideally, both chasers and spotters can work together for a common goal. Chasers are willing, Reed timmer asshole just need spotters to do the same. For the most part they do, aside from the islands of holdouts like Wichita County.

What can be done to change the false perceptions? Like you, I had a problem. My problem was Reed timmer asshole the original Blog article saying severe weather reports were being shunned Reed timmer asshole the public and putting them in danger.

That is simply not true. This Blog was well, unattended or not Reed timmer asshole closed nets. When a along it was a news paper article NOT written by Spotters that caused the problem. People are going to defend what they believe in no matter what and will argue over what they don't like. That is because we are human. BTW when severe weather is not threatening my counties of responsibility I chase too. I do so to continue learning about formation of severe weather and yes for the photos as well.

We run a closed net and for good reasons. NWS and local EM doesn't take reports from Reed timmer asshole spotter seriously unless they trust that spotter. That is why we run a closed net of trained trusted local spotters. Regarding this incident with the Australian station. He came on the net two years ago while multiple of our spotters wheir watching a severe thunderstorm that had two tornadoes on the ground at that time.

Our spotters had a hard time getting in to the repeater during that time because of the repeater shadow Reed timmer asshole that area. The same net control was in charge at that time Reed timmer asshole well and very politely told him that it was a closed net and he needed to make his reports else where and gave him frequencies that he could use.

And the Australian continued to come back and argued which in effect jammed our spotters from making critical life saving reports. In essence he already knew from last time that this net was closed and proceeded to key Reed timmer asshole our repeater Reed timmer asshole a critical time of the net when we had a violently rotating wall cloud with lowerings approaching the ground.

Again he gave a lengthy non critical report that blocked our spotters from contacting net control. That is why our NCS acted in the manner that he did and I support what he did. Reed timmer asshole the chasers verses spotters battle. Let me brake it Reed timmer asshole for you. Like the spotters Most of the public work and require sleep in a short period of time and don't need to be hiding in a celler if they don't need to be. And much of the Reed timmer asshole won't take cover Reed timmer asshole their local weather station can confirm that the hazards that the storm is capable of is in fact happening and is coming their way.

Chasers come from all over the country to chase storms and their is a few of them that actually collect potentially life saving data and pass it on to NWS. The rest is self proclaimed see more that more often then not pose a hazard to the spotters and real chasers by congesting highways and intersections that are escape routes for spotters and real chasers.

I have been trapped by these people before and it's not fun. Reed timmer asshole also tend to run hazard lights and other bright flashing lights that blind us during dangerous night spotting.

Which is in violation of several traffic laws.

Milwaukee xxx Watch PORN Movies Youtube porno. Even with a fair-weather-inducing high-pressure system hanging over the country's midsection, we saw thunderstorms that produced mile-per-hour straight-line winds, swirling super-cells dragging sweeps of rain, and lightning that would rival any Independence Day cannonade. Four of the women were just interested in taking photos of dramatic skies. The fifth, a woman in her sixties named Gwen, confided that she wanted to get really close to a tornado and wondered if Reed Timmer might let her ride along in the Dominator. If I started out as a tornado-tourism skeptic, I left convinced that it's a worthwhile enterprise. The guides keep a safe distance from their quarry and haven't killed anybody in more than a decade of operation. It's also highly educational. On any given day in the U. If you're willing to drive miles, you can probably witness it. And what you'll see is a general population blithely unaware of signs like anvil clouds and rain shafts until their cars and homes are engulfed by wind or hail. Spend one week chasing with a patient teacher like Reid and you'll never look at the sky the same way again. Nor will you be caught in a freak storm. Those don't exist. As Reid explains, the storm is always there in the data, even before it's a giant anvil-shaped thunderhead. When the dew points and high temperatures converge, the sky starts to look "juicy. Add more heat and Reid will notice that a few of the "Cu" clouds, as they're noted on weather maps, are looking "perky," then "beefy. Each morning, Reid held a weather briefing, projecting charts onto a motel-room wall. In the simplest terms, a thunderstorm is just a giant updraft sucking in moisture as what's called inflow. If the air is hot enough, the updraft will break through the inversion, called the cap, which typically sits a few thousand feet off the ground, and blast all the way to the stratosphere, where it flattens out into the anvil top of a cumulonimbus cloud. If conditions are right, with cold, high-altitude jet-stream winds coming out of the northwest and warm surface winds coming out of the southeast, the cell will develop a spin. Weather people call this a supercell and the swirling updraft within it a mesocyclone. But it's still not a tornado yet. As the spinning updraft peaks in intensity—usually in late afternoon, when the earth is at its hottest—a wall cloud might descend from the storm base. The lower the base, the less room air has to enter the updraft, so it accelerates, forming a tornado vortex. Finally, as the afternoon cools, the storm will release its rain and wind on the land in a giant sigh of outflow energy. Our group saw half a dozen supercells and one thunderstorm in Kansas that toppled tractor-trailers. At each stop, having guided us into ideal viewing position, Reid would deadpan, "Enjoy your storm. She didn't get to see her tornado, but she'll be back. As the southernmost storm in the line, it had no competition for the warm, moist air below it. And so it grew, and all of chaserdom—Timmer, Wurman, Samaras, Hoadley, Reid, and hundreds of others, along with their enthusiasm, egos, baggage, and restraint—was there to meet it with the kind of certainty that could make you believe a powerful tornado was not just likely but scheduled. But the forecast looked promising, so the pair rejoined their chase team and headed south. That afternoon, at 3: Samaras was heading south toward Canadian County when he issued his final tweet, at 4: Dangerous day ahead for OK—stay weather savvy! At just before 4 P. As the plane passed over central Oklahoma, he looked out the left-side window. Radar echoes show the El Reno storm topping out at 65, feet. Whether his warning was to blame for some of the traffic seems moot: Despite there being up to chasers in the El Reno area, nobody reported seeing the Twistex crew. That's probably because they were driving the Cobalt instead of their large, customized Chevy pickup; they'd left that behind in Kansas, where they were working on a lightning research project. Timmer and his Dominator crew were a quarter-mile north. Except that these were the size of fully formed tornadoes. Wurman's group was still well east of the storm, but their radar produced stunning images of its complex structure. As a vortex would briefly form and then vanish, Wurman's radar reading would spike to nearly mph, twice the main storm's mph winds. Chaser videos dramatically confirmed this. In one clip, a billboard on I seems to vaporize for no reason, exploding like it was hit by a death ray. Just because this chaser happens to be your buddy, doesn't mean that you get to use your position to bash someone for their public service. This closed-mindedness towards chasers in general is rather ignorant. I've studied mesoscale meteorology and supercell dynamics for more than 25 years, and am close friends with some of the most well-regarded scientists, spotters, and chasers in the US and Canada. I'm an active spotter, but I've actively started to shun ham radio in favor of cell communications with local emergency officials and NWS because of issues with territorial ops. This is no longer a public service, it's a regional clique, and quickly approaching the end of its usefulness. Nothing more. Using his death to shun the chasing community was disrespect, unethical and immoral. They owe him the respect he rightfully deserves. They better find room in their budget to gain by other means. No worries though, they'll never get a report from us. I'll call the media meteorologists instead. Let them ARES morons get their fat lazy butts off the radio and look out the window for reports. Let em trust their Skywarn noob's. Due to Ricks comments, after using chasers for free live streaming, for free data and research that they HAVE benefitted from, they can kiss my rump too. Yes, many chasers have video of tornados touching down without a warning in place. Sometimes without a watch in place much less a warning. WE call those in. I guess they forgot that we have more technology now than ever before. I guess they forget we can easily show the public the live streams and videos of unwarned cells that drop tornados. Maybe we need to start showing people how much the NWS screws up. Put them on blast since they just seem to love putting chasers on blast. Why bother with HAM? Submit your reports to or the NWS. Your description of the chaser is accurate, and I join you in sharing my complete trust in his laudable skills, admirable motivations, and professional conduct. Second, while I totally understand your frustration, I think you need to put yourself in Rick's position. Any time Rick is communicating as an employee of the NWS, he must be extremely mindful of the legal implications of what he says. If Rick is seen to condone, reward, or encourage storm chasing, and someone gets killed while storm chasing, he could be held liable, get his arse sued, and lose his job. So under no circumstances will we ever see Rick officially condone storm chasing or encourage members of the public to storm chase in order to make Wx observations and send in reports. But what about Skywarn Spotters? How is it that Rick can praise their work? Consequently, the NWS is being consistent with its mandate re: Contrast that with Storm Chasing, which can involve a wide range of unofficial activities that include some very risky activities. What gave Rick's quote a more controversial tone was not Rick's words, but the context within which it was used by the author of the newspaper article. All said, as always, 'with due respect' Apologies for the typo. That's right Leave my Storm Alone!! He also was NOT trying to make a severe weather report. There is procedures in place to make emergency transmissions on ham radio frequencies and being a seasoned ham operator he knows those procedures. He is not intitled to check in to a closed net just because he wants to. If he has an emergency then that a different thing all together. You also can hear on the mp3 file another chaser not following established rules set but the FCC on making illegal transmissions by not identifying him self after his unneeded comment. He probably does not even have a license to transmit on that frequency anyway. Another example of disregarding the rules and regs. The head line of the whole story is in essence the problem with open nets. But a closed net weeds out those kind of reports. The Net control operator does not have to figure out if that report is true or made up. Just report the facts nothing else just how it happened and exactly what you see. WOW sounds so fimiliar??? In other words they are their own albatross.. I sincerely hope there is an investigation to retrain the Wichita Falls ARES group and make them something usable instead of the seriously untrained group that's there now.. You being a meteorologist know you can not go by just one source of data. No lives are ever put in any danger because of closed severe weather nets. But lives can be put in danger during the time the net control operator is trying to sort out if a report from an unknown source is true or not. Timely warning as you know save lives. The NWS has to do that all the time. They have to put a forecaster on that task of trying to determine if the reports coming in from unknown sources are true. Closed Nets take care of that problem. Most chasers are members of Spotter Network. It goes directly to NWS!!! The whole thing in this case is over a very small sample of chasers mad about being told "Thanks but no thanks" No lives are in danger of not being told of severe weather threats. That's just hear say to add to the ill feelings of the chasers in question. It's just a closed severe weather net and move on. By the way I thank you for your time and work you have put in studying weather. We have a lot of work to do. Both in weather forecasting and weather warning dissemination. Because That is what saves lives!!! You need to consider the following issues. Representatives of NWS have made it abundantly clear to Skywarn trainees, spotters, and chasers that the two quickest ways to get Wx observations to their mets is 1. Ham radio 2. Only the NWS mets have the knowledge, qualifications, and authority to decide if a watch or warning has to be issued. The issue I have is that he watches radar from wherever and then when he sees a red pixel next to a green pixel a thousand miles away he tweets all about the big tornadoes coming. People take him seriously and then it gets spread faster than a cat picture. Warren Faidley EF5. May 7, 1, 21 Mos Isley Space Port www. Despite my strong disagreements with Timmer's chasing ethics, claims, behavior and how the current "face of chasing" reflects on the rest of us, he is a nice guy. The few times I've exchanged emails with him, including those following the death of Tim and crew, he was very kind and surprisingly professional. I also believe he contributes to severe weather awareness. If he'd drop the research, saving lives claims, etc He's also a sharp guy and it's too bad he does not devote the same promotional energy to actual research with a major institution. Jake Orosi EF4. Apr 14, 32 11 Alexandria, LA. I'm ambivalent about Reed Timmer. He likes weather, the way I do, and I hear he's personable; but I just can't really relate to him a whole lot. He's a celebrity. He does commercials for windshield wipers. He uses this big giant special vehicle and tries to get tornadoes to run over him. He's got a professional "rivalry" with another person like him. He makes a big deal of collecting data. Really, I'm just some guy with a truck who likes to watch storms; I don't find very much in common. The only difference between him and dozens of other chasers is that he has , followers on Facebook. The question then becomes: James Hilger EF3. Mar 14, 25 11 Siloam Springs, Arkansas. I used to not like him because of the way he "seemed" to be on the show. After realizing the truth I went to his house and personally apologized for things I had said publicly. He was friendly as can be. Forums New posts. Media New media New comments. Resources Latest reviews. Members Registered members Current visitors. Log in. New posts. Opinions regarding Reed Timmer from within the chaser community? Thread starter Andrew Clope Start date Jul 15, JavaScript is disabled. For a better experience, please enable JavaScript in your browser before proceeding. Andrew Clope EF1. Apr 24, 97 7 11 Peoria Illinois. It seemed that the overall impression and opinion of him and his teams aren't the greatest. Just curious if I was reading into that correctly? And what the general consensus is of him and his operations. I was asking because I met him earlier this year in North Platte, NE and he seemed like a really cool guy. Down to earth, took time to stand and talk for a bit, just overall seemed like a decent guy. BTW, not trying to start anything, just asking a legit question. Raymond Mason EF1. Feb 12, 56 1 6. I like Reed Timmer a lot. I mean he contributed a lot I would imagine to understanding tornadoes with his tornado intercept vehicle. Not to say the TIV time didn't get just as much data as Reed did. It seems like he contributes a lot to the field of meteorology. I mean I heard rumors of him getting speeding tickets, that doesn't mean his a bad person. No one is perfect. Meanwhile, according to founder Tyler Allison, the nonprofit Spotter Network claims roughly 37, "highly engaged spotters" who will deploy when there's a good storm in the neighborhood. Probably only of these are what Allison calls actual chasers, people "willing to drive hundreds if not thousands of miles a year" in search of tornadoes. These diehards begin each spring on the southern plains, where tornado season peaks in May. Then they move north, following the storms as summer progresses. In the aftermath of El Reno, news outlets broadcast segments asking whether stormchasers were morally challenged tourists who make vacations out of other people's misery. Some called for regulation. The reports ran plenty of thrilling "torn porn" B-roll shot by the very people in their crosshairs. Using Carlson's El Reno animation, one Oklahoma City news anchor made the case that stormchasers pose a public-safety hazard. John Francis, who directs research and exploration at the National Geographic Society, one of Samaras's sponsors, told The Washington Post that the scene, with its traffic jams and explosion of commercial tour operators, "reminds me a little bit of Everest. The phenomenon is known as chaser convergence, a reference to the meteorological concept, which describes opposing winds colliding to form storms. In short, you need a reason to be there. Among the justifications that chasers give, science is king. The trouble is, all these roles are self-defined. What happens with any big tornado is there's chasers around it, and, well, of those reports are pretty redundant. On that same Storm Track forum, chasers openly questioned one another's motives. The disaster on Mount Everest came up. One guy mocked a viral El Reno video in which Oklahoma-based Brandon Sullivan sits in the passenger seat of a vehicle that's getting blasted with debris, "screaming like a girl about how they're all going to die. In the YouTube era, close-up tornado video is valuable. But those windfalls are rare. To truly understand the subculture that descended upon El Reno, a good place to start is with the charismatic and somewhat manic guy who made tornado chasing an extreme sport worthy of the GoPro generation: Samaras's Discovery costar, Reed Timmer. Bring a raincoat. A metallic voice boomed: I took a few steps toward the already packed restroom shelters, contemplated the irony of having never encountered a tornado until this moment, and then ran for the exit. Overhead was a swirling column of dust rising from the tarmac to the heavens. It was a beautiful LP that's low-precipitation EF-0 tornado that Timmer, looking at my photo after he'd pulled up in the armored Dominator 3, told me would have condensed into a funnel cloud if the humidity had been a bit higher. Timmer, who's based in Norman, is a boyish and engaging 33, with close-cropped brown hair perennially crammed under a backward baseball cap. For roughly six years, he says, he's been working on his Ph. According to his memoir, Into the Storm , he got his big break chasing the killer Moore, Oklahoma, tornado on foot while offering color commentary. Like most chasers, Timmer can recall the date, location, and EF rating of just about every tornado he's ever seen. Chasers don't talk about seeing tornadoes so much as "getting" them, which is to say possessing them like a Grateful Dead ticket stub or memorable summit photo. Or rather we "blasted" north, in the parlance of chaser lingo, tracking a low-pressure trough that was supposed to move across Montana and North Dakota. The Dominator, with its angular matte black exterior, looks like the offspring of a monster truck and the Batmobile. At every gas station crowds mobbed Timmer, asking the same series of questions, to which he always enthusiastically answered: It soon became clear that chasing, in its essence, is a long drive with an indeterminate destination and terrible food. Racing across America's breadbasket, it's nearly impossible to purchase anything that has grown out of the ground. About the only similarity with Everest is the risk of blood clots, in this case from sitting for so long rather than from the blood-thickening effects of altitude. Several of Timmer's crew joke that they can feel them forming. The Dominator team sleeps only in fair weather. They empty Gatorade jugs—and then refill them instead of stopping to relieve themselves. They talk about the weather. As he stepped out of the truck, he uncovered something smashed beneath his jeans. Timmer, like Wurman and Samaras before he died , is working on tornadogenesis, though his efforts have a decidedly more homespun feel. Instead of the million-dollar Doppler-radar trucks that Wurman uses, or the steel turtle probes Samaras designed, Timmer attempts to get his weather sensors into tornados via delivery systems that seem like schemes to escape Gilligan's Island. Though he initially had success deploying parachute probes with a foot fixed-wing drone, the FAA grounded him. He is a nice guy the few times we have crossed paths. At the same time it is not throwing him under the bus to say he has not contributed as much to tornado science as many other scientists focused on that area of study. Todd Lemery EF4. Jun 2, 21 53 Menominee, MI. Without having ever met him personally, no one has posted that he is a jerk or anything. Seems to me that the overall impression from the postings is that he is a genuinely down to earth nice guy. Reed actually makes an effort to collect data, although none may have resulted in any breakthroughs, that doesn't mean it was a waste of time or that there won't be any revelations coming in the future. It takes time to figure out a better way to do things. The area where he probably shines the most is raising awareness of storms events. Quite honestly, when Reed is on TV telling people to be on their toes, they tend to pay attention to him more than the average guy. As far as worrying about him unintentionally encouraging others to get themselves in dangerous spots, I can see where that criticism comes from ,but people have to take responsibility for their own actions. If not, you should blame Darwin more than Reed. Hi Dale, good question on the actual data. I honestly don't know what kind of success he's had retrieving data. I know that he has launched or attempted at times various probes that I really have no idea how successful they were or weren't. My point was that in trying different probes and experimenting, he may not have gotten or may have useful data, but by trial and error he just might come up with one that consistently produces results and changes what we know about tornados. As far as being on TV, he does do some in station interviews, but I was mostly referring to the live reporting he does during chases with various channels via cell phone. Then post the data if it really exists. Since he hasn't, yet that was the sole stated purpose for collecting data, When is he on TV? I should be doing pictures and videos on this week off I have for medical leave He was doing live reports through last year's major tornado days in the OKC area, but so far this year they haven't had much around the city. So a few people keep bringing up the data contribution thing. And it's an interesting point. It seems to be that the most misunderstood portion of a tornado other than why some mesocyclones produce them and some don't , is the lower portion near ground level. I remember him attaching a radar pointing in the vertical along with all of his other instrumentation..

And they tend to block the view of spotters with their vehicles which limits our effectiveness. Please if you are not credentialed members of NWS or Skywarn.

Don't endanger us and the public by clogging up the highways. I insist that you now furnish evidence to support your story. Ideally, you or the net controller records Reed timmer asshole all activity on the relevant frequency.

Everyone following this blog needs you find that evening's audio and share it NOW. I guess they forgot Reed timmer asshole we have more technology now than ever before. I guess they forget we can easily show the public the live streams and videos of unwarned Reed timmer asshole that drop tornados. Maybe we need to start showing people how much the NWS screws up. Put them on blast since they just seem to love putting chasers Reed timmer asshole blast.

Why bother with HAM?

Japanese gay boy porn

Submit your reports to or the NWS. Your description of the chaser is accurate, and I join you in sharing my complete trust in his laudable skills, admirable motivations, and professional Reed timmer asshole. Second, while I totally understand your frustration, I think you need to put yourself in Rick's position. Any time Rick is communicating as an employee of the NWS, he must be extremely mindful of the legal implications of what he says. If Rick is seen to condone, reward, or encourage storm chasing, and someone gets killed while storm chasing, he could be held liable, get his Reed timmer asshole sued, and lose his job.

So under no circumstances will we ever see Rick officially condone storm chasing or encourage members of the public to storm chase in order to make Wx observations Reed timmer asshole send in reports. But what about Source Spotters? How is it that Rick can praise their work? Consequently, the NWS is being consistent with its mandate re: Contrast that with Storm Chasing, which can involve a wide range of unofficial activities that include some very risky activities.

What gave Rick's quote a more controversial tone was not Rick's words, but the context within which it was used by the author of the newspaper article. All said, as always, 'with due respect' Apologies for the typo. That's right Leave click here Storm Alone!!

He also was NOT trying to make a severe weather report. There is procedures in place to make emergency transmissions on ham radio frequencies and being a seasoned ham operator he knows those procedures. He is not intitled Reed timmer asshole check in to a closed net just because he wants to. If he has an emergency then that a different thing all together. You also can hear on the mp3 file another chaser not following established rules set but the FCC on making illegal transmissions by not identifying him self after his unneeded comment.

He probably does not even have a license to transmit on that frequency anyway. Another Reed timmer asshole of disregarding the source and regs. The head line of the whole story is in essence the problem with Reed timmer asshole nets. But a closed net Reed timmer asshole out those kind of reports.

The Net control operator does not have to figure out if that report Reed timmer asshole true or made up.

Jennefir White

Just report the facts nothing else just how it happened and exactly what you see. WOW sounds so fimiliar???

Wwwxnx Porn Watch Sex Movies Koster Xxx. Joey Ketcham said: What exactly has he contributed to better understanding tornadoes? Can you cite a specific scientific journal that back's that claim that he has contributed to understanding tornadoes? I would love to read that and see the data he has collected. Marcus Diaz EF5. Aug 16, 21 30 Amarillo, TX. Lmao this thread will be getting ugly pretty quick. But honestly he's a good guy. I met him pre-Discovery Channel and he was approachable. He gave this newb a crash course on a developing tornado. I also know people say he's annoying and egotistical. Thing is there's a lot of chasers like that. He does get some of the craziest footage out there and has grown a company from scratch. The fact that he has a lot of followers is just a result of exposure. It's no different than any other big named celebrity. Rob H EF5. Mar 11, 5 0 Twin Cities, MN. It's funny that the community will rally to any number of lesser chasers but are quick to throw Reed and Sean Casey under the wheels at a moments notice. The few times I've talked to either of them away from the crowds and the cameras they both came off as relaxed, cool people with a passion for weather. It's strange because while Storm Chasers is probably a large factor in some of the negative things in this hobby, it never explicitly showed anything that I would consider egregious. At some point you need to hold individuals responsible for their behavior and not blame the "celebrity" chasers. In contrast, there are pseudo celebrity chasers that really kick up the glamorizing of the extreme aspect and do stupid things. Everyone on Storm Chasers was involved in academia or research to some degree and has done public outreach. They could care less about the true issues, they just want the story. I would definitely say that the ARES net seems to require an overhaul or retraining in that region though. This needs to be a live and learn issue. Learn from it, use what's learned and apply it to policy and move on with the added knowledge. Everyone should be working together to reach the ultimate goal Safety of life and property. Now, if your the Dj I think you are, I know you truly wouldn't without the data and research you guys do from anyone. Doing so doesn't affect the NWS or this ARES net, it only affects the people your doing the research for, the people we all wish to ensure remain safe Think about that. I need a new talk to type app! This 'respected chaser' has caused problems on the Closed Net in other years, multiple years. He was politely told the status and that the area he was in was NOT in our area, referred appropriately, and asked not to transmit on the closed net. He wouldn't let it go, kept pushing the issue, all of this while there was a tornado on the ground IN THE AREA and spotters who needed to speak with the NC, but couldn't because the chaser kept monopolizing the frequency with long, eloquently-worded soliloquies. His interference that year became a safety issue. He is lucky nobody was injured that day, as he could be liable for preventing the very emergency communication that he politely says he so desperately wants to be able to provide. We have a history with this 'respected chaser'. He already knows the status here, but seems to me to enjoy testing the waters every year to raise a stink, very politely always, repeated every storm season, right in the middle of our high-stress activation. We need to know the folks who check into our nets, we need to know that they can accurately describe the weather feature they see and interpret it, we need to know they can accurately describe the location of the weather feature, and aren't mistaken about what road they are on. We know the similar and confusing road names around here, and which roads with the same name don't go through in certain spots, or concurrently run into having a different name at some point. We know what building or company or landmark is in the path of the weather feature. We know the alternate escape routes that are NOT shown on the maps because we live here and travel these roads and keep up with construction. This man 'knows the Wichita Falls area [very well]' because he's 'been through here several times'. I'm sorry, that's not what we need on the Closed Net. And everyone with their panties in a wad over their perception of his supposed mistreatment, if you don't live here, if you don't enter the group and train and re-train and re-certify annually, and progress with a seasoned spotter until they sign off on your ability to correctly assess what you see, then you don't have a dog in this fight. We are disciplined for all the right reasons, and we are respected by the NWS as a highly trained and accurate source for weather reports. You don't get to fly the chopper till you show you can handle the similator. You don't get to drive at 60mph until you show you can handle the car at You don't get to enter the gated community if you don't have clearance. And you don't get to give willy nilly 'reports' on the Closed Net here until you are approved by the trained and experienced leadership of the Net Controls and the County Emergency Management group. And if this man is such a great friend of Rick Smith, maybe he should get Rick to write him a personal letter of recommendation and send it to the ARES Coordinator, requesting to accept his reports. Funny, he does this every year, and yet no letter from Rick supporting him. What if I see severe weather? Can I check in then? What if I see a car overturned in the ditch? What if I see an armadillo born dead on the side of the road, can I check in then? I'm reminded of someone raising a stink, not because they really want Company A to make their wedding cake, but because they want Company A to refuse Oh well, like other things, everyone has an opinion. Some are based on misperception, and others are based on the complete story. Many other spotter nets around the Plains and Midwest are not closed, and they apparently do just fine. The Norman, OK net, which the spotter in question was coming from when he attempted to hand-off to Wichita Falls, is in the most chaser-dense metro area in the world, yet we don't see them complaining about errant chasers. While I recognize the right of an operator to close their net, I question the reason why it is necessary and how it furthers the mission of the net in the first place. Can someone offer some insight? Because the whole story is about a chaser wacting to check in to a net that is closed. Closed nets are not closed to keep out chasers. Thats just dumb. Closed nets are closed to keep out false reporting from unknown people. Emergency traffic is and will always be allowed on closed nets. Someone just got their feelings hurt and saying stuff that just does or will not happen. In this case it's just that simple. This chaser records everything he does and archives them also. It is people like you that should not be allowed to comment on articles like this, because you do nothing but lie. Remember, this is just my opinion. Would I be allowed to make a report then? What if I had to call out for station in distress? Would I be told to go to a different frequency? You see, that's my problem and that has the potential to get someone hurt. Dang get that through you thick skulls. Well established nets do follow FCC rules with regard to that. That is not what is in question here. The mp3 file recording of the second chaser making a transmittion and not identify his station. That does not cast a good shadow for the whole argument of the story. Absolutely loved this page I got my ass chewed by whoever runs this page. I hope he's very proud for being a complete asshole while now even the Mayor of Houston is pissed at Red Cross for unfulfilled promises. Sorry not sorry for the shitty review but maybe next time you'll do better research. Oh yeah and then they blocked me from the page, because getting told to look into something a little more really hurt their egos. See more. I am a little or a lot scared of tornadoes and bad weather, I love that u keep us up to date when As the southernmost storm in the line, it had no competition for the warm, moist air below it. And so it grew, and all of chaserdom—Timmer, Wurman, Samaras, Hoadley, Reid, and hundreds of others, along with their enthusiasm, egos, baggage, and restraint—was there to meet it with the kind of certainty that could make you believe a powerful tornado was not just likely but scheduled. But the forecast looked promising, so the pair rejoined their chase team and headed south. That afternoon, at 3: Samaras was heading south toward Canadian County when he issued his final tweet, at 4: Dangerous day ahead for OK—stay weather savvy! At just before 4 P. As the plane passed over central Oklahoma, he looked out the left-side window. Radar echoes show the El Reno storm topping out at 65, feet. Whether his warning was to blame for some of the traffic seems moot: Despite there being up to chasers in the El Reno area, nobody reported seeing the Twistex crew. That's probably because they were driving the Cobalt instead of their large, customized Chevy pickup; they'd left that behind in Kansas, where they were working on a lightning research project. Timmer and his Dominator crew were a quarter-mile north. Except that these were the size of fully formed tornadoes. Wurman's group was still well east of the storm, but their radar produced stunning images of its complex structure. As a vortex would briefly form and then vanish, Wurman's radar reading would spike to nearly mph, twice the main storm's mph winds. Chaser videos dramatically confirmed this. In one clip, a billboard on I seems to vaporize for no reason, exploding like it was hit by a death ray. Then the storm did something odd. The 2. Just as quickly, it was obscured by rain. None of the chasers saw it accelerate, expand, and suddenly zag northeast. Half a mile to the west, on the shoulder of Highway 81, Weather Channel meteorologist Mike Bettes was just going live. In the footage from that day, you can see him examine the storm, glowing ice blue with hail, before suddenly having a frightening realization: Right there! There's the tornado! Hold on," Bettes yelled. The team's camera was ejected from the window but miraculously captured their Tornado Hunt vehicle tumbling through a field. Bettes's car was the second of three in the Weather Channel caravan, but the other two stayed on the road. At that point, Timmer and the Dominator were trying to get back in the chase. But just as they turned north, they plowed into a tangle of downed power lines. The driver gunned the engine in reverse, but the lines had hooked over a light bar and whipped the hood off the car like a slingshot. Their chase was over. They headed down Highway 81, where they encountered Bettes and Anderson surveying the damage. Anderson didn't realize it at the time, but as the car tumbled, he had fractured several vertebrae and ribs, along with his sternum. Once the tornado became obscured by rain, Hoadley and others abandoned the chase. Camille Seaman, a Shinnecock Indian, had seen an owl fly over their van, which, she told the group, meant someone was going to die. Wurman never got closer than two miles. Hold on," Bettes yelled. The team's camera was ejected from the window but miraculously captured their Tornado Hunt vehicle tumbling through a field. Bettes's car was the second of three in the Weather Channel caravan, but the other two stayed on the road. At that point, Timmer and the Dominator were trying to get back in the chase. But just as they turned north, they plowed into a tangle of downed power lines. The driver gunned the engine in reverse, but the lines had hooked over a light bar and whipped the hood off the car like a slingshot. Their chase was over. They headed down Highway 81, where they encountered Bettes and Anderson surveying the damage. Anderson didn't realize it at the time, but as the car tumbled, he had fractured several vertebrae and ribs, along with his sternum. Once the tornado became obscured by rain, Hoadley and others abandoned the chase. Camille Seaman, a Shinnecock Indian, had seen an owl fly over their van, which, she told the group, meant someone was going to die. Wurman never got closer than two miles. But the scene across that part of Oklahoma was almost as scary as the twister itself. It was like one of these zombie apocalypse movies. People were banging on our windows, insisting that we tell them where the tornado was and how to get to safety. Farther west on I, state trooper Betsy Randolph was pulled off the road. The car was totaled by debris; the trooper survived. Local amateur chaser Richard "Pup" Henderson, 33, wasn't so lucky. A truck driver who'd followed tornadoes with a news crew on a few occasions, Henderson snapped a cell-phone photo of the twister that moments later would kill him. For months after the storm, there was speculation about what had happened to Samaras's team. But theories that Samaras was caught in a chaser traffic jam never panned out. According to the time stamp on the footage, the Samarases, with Carl Young at the wheel, crossed Highway 81 at 6: At that point, the tornado was still moving southeast. But just 30 seconds later, that changed. Robinson, who moved to St. Louis from West Virginia eight years ago to chase storms full-time, saw immediately that the storm was now angling toward him. He mashed the accelerator, bringing the Yaris up to 43 mph, fishtailing on the washboard gravel road and blowing through three stop signs. In the video, the headlights of the Cobalt fade into the rain about a half-mile back. You can see the main funnel, still only a few hundred yards wide, churn to the southeast, and a patch of sky opens up above the Cobalt. But within 30 seconds, that patch disappears and the entire storm has dropped to the ground. It was at this point, meteorologists believe, that the tornado reached maximum width and intensity. According to Rick Smith, the whole supercell accelerated briefly to 50 mph. The four-cylinder Cobalt, loaded down with three men and a trunkful of steel tornado probes, was pushing against an inflow headwind of 60 to 80 mph. It simply couldn't go faster than the storm. The tornado planted on top of them, and a suction vortex very likely sent the car tumbling with enough centrifugal force to eject two of the three men. It belonged to Young, but the recording cuts out well before the Twistex team's final moments. Nor did Paul Samaras's Canon C camera, which was also recovered, shed any light on what happened. As tragic as those deaths are, they shouldn't be surprising. Most newspapers bar reporters from writing about, or including quotes from friends or family members, although there may be some exceptions, if the reporter is open about it. In an autobiography or memoir, obviously it is fine. Even here, however, there is an obligation: In other words, would the reporter pull punches because he's a friend of the source? That's why it is usually a good idea to stay clear of using friends and relatives in articles in most instances. Please note that IP addresses are logged. Abuse will be reported to ISPs or corporate network management. The following comments were posted before this site switched to a new comment system on August 27, Couldn't agree more. I made sure I took courses and studied severe weather and forecasting as much as I could before becoming a more serious chaser. I often spot here in the Houston area not a lot of spotters here from what I can tell and have found myself alone to report severe weather on several occasions. Would be good to see more respect for chasers in general. Local thrill chasers who have no training won't be making reports anyways. They're focused on seeing naders. However, Part 97 also states that if there is any life threatening emergency, the NCO has to allow the radio transmission. Seasoned chasers is one thing, but the glamorization of "chasing" has put a lot of novice people in harmful situations. If they want to make a report, do it directly with the NWS. It is the NCSs discretion to take a report or not. Just because this chaser happens to be your buddy, doesn't mean that you get to use your position to bash someone for their public service. This closed-mindedness towards chasers in general is rather ignorant. I've studied mesoscale meteorology and supercell dynamics for more than 25 years, and am close friends with some of the most well-regarded scientists, spotters, and chasers in the US and Canada. I'm an active spotter, but I've actively started to shun ham radio in favor of cell communications with local emergency officials and NWS because of issues with territorial ops. This is no longer a public service, it's a regional clique, and quickly approaching the end of its usefulness. Nothing more. Using his death to shun the chasing community was disrespect, unethical and immoral. They owe him the respect he rightfully deserves. They better find room in their budget to gain by other means. No worries though, they'll never get a report from us. I'll call the media meteorologists instead. Let them ARES morons get their fat lazy butts off the radio and look out the window for reports. Let em trust their Skywarn noob's. Due to Ricks comments, after using chasers for free live streaming, for free data and research that they HAVE benefitted from, they can kiss my rump too. Yes, many chasers have video of tornados touching down without a warning in place. Sometimes without a watch in place much less a warning. WE call those in. I guess they forgot that we have more technology now than ever before. I guess they forget we can easily show the public the live streams and videos of unwarned cells that drop tornados. Maybe we need to start showing people how much the NWS screws up. Put them on blast since they just seem to love putting chasers on blast. Why bother with HAM? Submit your reports to or the NWS. Your description of the chaser is accurate, and I join you in sharing my complete trust in his laudable skills, admirable motivations, and professional conduct. Second, while I totally understand your frustration, I think you need to put yourself in Rick's position. Any time Rick is communicating as an employee of the NWS, he must be extremely mindful of the legal implications of what he says. If Rick is seen to condone, reward, or encourage storm chasing, and someone gets killed while storm chasing, he could be held liable, get his arse sued, and lose his job. So under no circumstances will we ever see Rick officially condone storm chasing or encourage members of the public to storm chase in order to make Wx observations and send in reports. But what about Skywarn Spotters? How is it that Rick can praise their work? Consequently, the NWS is being consistent with its mandate re: Contrast that with Storm Chasing, which can involve a wide range of unofficial activities that include some very risky activities. What gave Rick's quote a more controversial tone was not Rick's words, but the context within which it was used by the author of the newspaper article. All said, as always, 'with due respect' Apologies for the typo. That's right Leave my Storm Alone!! He also was NOT trying to make a severe weather report. There is procedures in place to make emergency transmissions on ham radio frequencies and being a seasoned ham operator he knows those procedures. He is not intitled to check in to a closed net just because he wants to. If he has an emergency then that a different thing all together. You also can hear on the mp3 file another chaser not following established rules set but the FCC on making illegal transmissions by not identifying him self after his unneeded comment. He probably does not even have a license to transmit on that frequency anyway. I'm surprised that the net controller kept his cool as well as he did since this is NOT the first incident with this disrespectful chaser. The Australian chaser has been a pain, he was in oklahoma reporting into a Texas net. I was listening to the whole thing live on the radio and all of you that make comments that were not there should shut your mouth because you know not of what you speak. He should be arrested for endangering peoples lives after he was told to be silent. It can be found in the Stormtrack thread linked here on this page. Yes the audio is well edited by the ARES group because I was watching the entire live stream with audio from start to finish So I heard all, And you saying he was in Oklahoma is straight out rubbish, Because he was working the area between Wichita Falls through Gainesville east to Sherman, Then down to Greenville and Terrell. Then back up skirting around Dallas to Denton and then back to Wichita Falls. And why try to check in to Wichita County bypassing Clay County net which is between where you say he was and where he was going. Montague County in that area where he was as well. Check in for those????? Why leave the Cryil net anyway. OUN monitors that frequency anyway? Just plain dumb to leave that net and try to check into a known closed net - Posted by Fisherman from Texas One of the main issues I see is a widespread unfamiliarity in much of the spotter community of what storm chasers do and how much knowledge we have about severe weather. In order to be a successful chaser, we really have to put in the time to learn meteorology on a fairly detailed level. Most of us have learned to do our own forecasting, and have paid our dues with many failed forecasts and busted chases. It's expensive to chase, so we have incentive to learn. We all spend our own money, any revenue we make from video sales goes toward possibly covering SOME of our gas money. Most chasers really do have extensive knowledge and can offer something of value to any spotter net. Again, we both agree on the bad apples that exist out there that ruin it for everyone. This is giving a bad rap to people who don't deserve it. He's not a threat to any spotter group, he's an asset, and other net ops can testify to this. From what I understand, he's made the effort in the past to introduce himself to the Wichita County group for this very purpose, and his only mistake may have been misunderstanding the implications of trying to check into such a rigidly closed net. I don't however respect the perpetuation of the yahoo chaser stereotype and the broadbrushing of it to apply to all of us as the article does. Furthermore, from what I've seen across the internet in the past few days, the "all chasers are yahoos" stereotype is widepread across the spotter community forums, Reddit, Facebook, etc. We'd simply appreciate a better understanding of what we do and an acknowledgement that we have something to offer the spotter community. You will rarely, if ever, find chasers disparaging spotters - on the contrary, we are always highly supportive of what they bring to the table. It's unfortunate that the feeling is rarely mutual, and I think this is due to a long-standing stereotype that the news pieces only further perpetuate. The best I can do is provide video evidence of what chasers actually do and what our chases are really like. Again, I've provided links to over 20 full-day videos from me and other chasers to help show this. Ideally, both chasers and spotters can work together for a common goal. Chasers are willing, we just need spotters to do the same. For the most part they do, aside from the islands of holdouts like Wichita County. What can be done to change the false perceptions? Like you, I had a problem. My problem was with the original Blog article saying severe weather reports were being shunned from the public and putting them in danger. That is simply not true. This Blog was well, unattended or not blaming closed nets. When a along it was a news paper article NOT written by Spotters that caused the problem. People are going to defend what they believe in no matter what and will argue over what they don't like. That is because we are human. BTW when severe weather is not threatening my counties of responsibility I chase too. I do so to continue learning about formation of severe weather and yes for the photos as well. We run a closed net and for good reasons. NWS and local EM doesn't take reports from one spotter seriously unless they trust that spotter. That is why we run a closed net of trained trusted local spotters. Regarding this incident with the Australian station. He came on the net two years ago while multiple of our spotters wheir watching a severe thunderstorm that had two tornadoes on the ground at that time. Our spotters had a hard time getting in to the repeater during that time because of the repeater shadow over that area. The same net control was in charge at that time as well and very politely told him that it was a closed net and he needed to make his reports else where and gave him frequencies that he could use. And the Australian continued to come back and argued which in effect jammed our spotters from making critical life saving reports. In essence he already knew from last time that this net was closed and proceeded to key up our repeater during a critical time of the net when we had a violently rotating wall cloud with lowerings approaching the ground. Again he gave a lengthy non critical report that blocked our spotters from contacting net control. That is why our NCS acted in the manner that he did and I support what he did. Regarding the chasers verses spotters battle. Let me brake it down for you. Like the spotters Most of the public work and require sleep in a short period of time and don't need to be hiding in a celler if they don't need to be. And much of the public won't take cover unless their local weather station can confirm that the hazards that the storm is capable of is in fact happening and is coming their way. Chasers come from all over the country to chase storms and their is a few of them that actually collect potentially life saving data and pass it on to NWS. The rest is self proclaimed chasers that more often then not pose a hazard to the spotters and real chasers by congesting highways and intersections that are escape routes for spotters and real chasers. I have been trapped by these people before and it's not fun..

In other words they are their own albatross. I sincerely hope there is an investigation to retrain the Wichita Falls ARES group and make them something usable instead of the seriously untrained group that's there Reed timmer asshole.

You being a Reed timmer asshole know you can not go by just one source of data. No lives are ever put in any danger because of closed severe weather nets. But lives can be put in danger during the time the net control operator is trying to sort out if a report from Reed timmer asshole unknown source is true or not. Timely warning as you know save lives. The NWS has to do that all the time. They have Reed timmer asshole put a forecaster on that task of trying to determine if the reports coming in from unknown sources are true.

Closed Nets take care of that problem. Most chasers are members of Spotter Network. It goes directly to NWS!!! The whole thing in this Reed timmer asshole is over a very small sample of chasers mad about being told "Thanks but no thanks" No lives are in danger of not being told of severe weather threats.

That's just hear say to add to the ill feelings of the chasers in question. It's just a closed severe weather net and move on. By the way I thank you for your time and work you have put in studying weather. We have a lot of work to do. Article source in weather forecasting and weather warning dissemination.

Because That is what saves lives!!! You need to consider the following issues. Representatives of NWS have made it abundantly clear to Skywarn trainees, spotters, and chasers that the two quickest ways to get Wx observations to their mets is Reed timmer asshole. Ham radio 2. Only the NWS mets have the knowledge, qualifications, and authority to decide if a watch or warning has to be issued.

The bottom line? We're all human, and mistakes happen, so what occurred is just another Reed timmer asshole situation. Then, everyone can move on, put the incident Reed timmer asshole the past, and return to our common goal - serving the needs of the public to the best of everyone's ability. Fisherman, you're missing the main point here. We share the same goal and that is to ensure protection of life and property. An annual estimate will do. Perhaps this is a genuine, demonstrable problem and Lynn should've And we're still Reed timmer asshole the Reed timmer asshole issue.

Like most hard-bitten chasers, Reid has arranged his life around the weather, working Reed timmer asshole at an Albertsons. Over the course of a week, we drove some 3, miles Reed timmer asshole Colorado, Nebraska, Kansas, and Iowa, and into New Mexico. Even with a fair-weather-inducing high-pressure system hanging over the country's midsection, we saw thunderstorms that produced Reed timmer asshole straight-line winds, swirling super-cells dragging sweeps of rain, and lightning that would rival any Independence Day cannonade.

Four of the women were just interested in taking photos of dramatic skies. The fifth, Reed timmer asshole woman in her sixties named Gwen, confided that she wanted to get really close to a tornado and wondered if Reed Timmer might let her ride along in the Dominator.

If I started out as a tornado-tourism skeptic, I left convinced that it's a worthwhile enterprise. The guides keep a safe distance from their quarry and haven't killed anybody in more than a decade of operation. It's also highly educational. On any given day in the U. If you're willing to drive miles, you can probably witness it.

And what you'll see is a general population blithely unaware of signs like anvil clouds and rain shafts until their cars and homes are engulfed by wind or hail.

Spend one week chasing with a patient teacher like Reid Reed timmer asshole you'll never look at the sky the same way again. Nor Reed timmer asshole you be caught in a freak storm. Those don't exist. As Reid explains, the storm is always there in the data, even before it's a giant anvil-shaped thunderhead. When the dew points and high temperatures converge, the sky starts to look "juicy. Add more heat and Reid will Reed timmer asshole that a few of the "Cu" clouds, as they're noted on weather maps, are looking "perky," then "beefy.

Each morning, Reid held a weather briefing, projecting charts onto a motel-room wall. In the simplest terms, a thunderstorm is just a giant updraft sucking in moisture as what's called inflow. If the air is hot enough, Reed timmer asshole updraft will break through the inversion, called the cap, which typically sits a few thousand feet off the ground, and blast all the way to the stratosphere, where it flattens out into the anvil top of a cumulonimbus cloud.

If conditions are right, with cold, high-altitude jet-stream winds coming out of the northwest Reed timmer asshole warm surface winds coming out of the southeast, the cell will develop a spin. Weather people call this a supercell and the swirling updraft within it a mesocyclone. Visit web page Reed timmer asshole still not a tornado yet.

As the spinning updraft peaks in intensity—usually in late afternoon, when the earth is at its hottest—a wall cloud might descend from the storm base. The lower the base, the less room air has to enter the updraft, so it accelerates, forming a tornado vortex. Finally, as the afternoon cools, the storm will release its rain and wind on the land in Reed timmer asshole giant sigh of outflow energy.

Mobile porn free downloads

Our group saw half a dozen supercells and one thunderstorm in Kansas that toppled tractor-trailers. At each stop, having guided us into ideal viewing position, Reid would deadpan, "Enjoy your storm.

She didn't get to see her tornado, but she'll be back. As the southernmost storm in the line, it had no competition for the warm, moist air below it. And so it grew, and all of chaserdom—Timmer, Wurman, Samaras, Hoadley, Reid, and hundreds Reed timmer asshole others, along with their enthusiasm, egos, Reed timmer asshole, and restraint—was there to meet it with the kind of certainty Reed timmer asshole could make you believe a powerful tornado was not just likely but scheduled.

Sexy suzy porn

But the forecast looked promising, so the pair rejoined their chase team and headed south. That afternoon, at 3: Samaras was heading south toward Canadian County when he issued his final tweet, at 4: Dangerous day ahead for OK—stay weather savvy! Reed timmer asshole just before 4 P. As the plane passed over central Oklahoma, he looked out the left-side window. Radar echoes show the El Reno storm topping out at 65, feet. Hot girls with jiggly boobs tumblr videos.

Wednesday, April Reed timmer asshole, Writing about friends and family members: Most newspapers bar reporters from writing about, or including quotes from friends or family members, although there may be some exceptions, if the reporter is open about it. In an autobiography or memoir, obviously it is fine. Even here, however, there is an obligation: In other words, would the reporter Reed timmer asshole punches because he's Reed timmer asshole friend of the source?

That's why it is usually a good idea to stay clear of using friends and relatives in articles in most instances. Please note that IP addresses are logged. Abuse will be reported to ISPs or corporate network management. The following comments were Reed timmer asshole before this site switched to a new comment system on August 27, Couldn't agree more.

I made sure I took courses and studied severe weather and forecasting as much as I could before becoming Reed timmer asshole more serious chaser. I often spot here in the Houston area not Reed timmer asshole lot of spotters here from what I can tell and have found myself alone to report severe weather on several occasions. Would be good to see more respect for chasers in general. Local thrill chasers who have no training won't be making reports anyways.

They're focused on seeing naders. However, Part 97 also states that click there is any life threatening emergency, the NCO has to allow the radio transmission. Seasoned chasers is one thing, but the glamorization of "chasing" has put a lot of novice people in harmful situations.

If they want to make a report, do it directly with the NWS. Click to see more is the NCSs discretion to take a report or not.

Mature redhead with boy outdoors

Reed timmer asshole Just because this chaser happens to be your buddy, doesn't mean that you get to use your position to bash someone for their public service. This closed-mindedness towards chasers in general Reed timmer asshole rather ignorant. I've studied mesoscale meteorology and supercell dynamics for more than 25 years, and am close friends with some of the most well-regarded scientists, spotters, and chasers in the US and Canada.

I'm an active spotter, but I've actively started to shun ham radio in favor of cell communications with local emergency officials and NWS because of issues with territorial ops. This is no longer a public service, it's a regional clique, and quickly approaching the end of its usefulness. Nothing more. Using his death to shun the chasing community Reed timmer asshole disrespect, unethical and immoral.

They owe him the respect he rightfully deserves. They better find room in their budget to gain by other means. No worries though, they'll never get a report from us. I'll call the media meteorologists instead. Let them ARES morons get their fat lazy Reed timmer asshole off the radio and look out the window for reports.

Freesexmatch com Watch XXX Movies Kajal Raghwanisex. But it's still not a tornado yet. As the spinning updraft peaks in intensity—usually in late afternoon, when the earth is at its hottest—a wall cloud might descend from the storm base. The lower the base, the less room air has to enter the updraft, so it accelerates, forming a tornado vortex. Finally, as the afternoon cools, the storm will release its rain and wind on the land in a giant sigh of outflow energy. Our group saw half a dozen supercells and one thunderstorm in Kansas that toppled tractor-trailers. At each stop, having guided us into ideal viewing position, Reid would deadpan, "Enjoy your storm. She didn't get to see her tornado, but she'll be back. As the southernmost storm in the line, it had no competition for the warm, moist air below it. And so it grew, and all of chaserdom—Timmer, Wurman, Samaras, Hoadley, Reid, and hundreds of others, along with their enthusiasm, egos, baggage, and restraint—was there to meet it with the kind of certainty that could make you believe a powerful tornado was not just likely but scheduled. But the forecast looked promising, so the pair rejoined their chase team and headed south. That afternoon, at 3: Samaras was heading south toward Canadian County when he issued his final tweet, at 4: Dangerous day ahead for OK—stay weather savvy! At just before 4 P. As the plane passed over central Oklahoma, he looked out the left-side window. Radar echoes show the El Reno storm topping out at 65, feet. Whether his warning was to blame for some of the traffic seems moot: Despite there being up to chasers in the El Reno area, nobody reported seeing the Twistex crew. That's probably because they were driving the Cobalt instead of their large, customized Chevy pickup; they'd left that behind in Kansas, where they were working on a lightning research project. Timmer and his Dominator crew were a quarter-mile north. Except that these were the size of fully formed tornadoes. Wurman's group was still well east of the storm, but their radar produced stunning images of its complex structure. As a vortex would briefly form and then vanish, Wurman's radar reading would spike to nearly mph, twice the main storm's mph winds. Chaser videos dramatically confirmed this. In one clip, a billboard on I seems to vaporize for no reason, exploding like it was hit by a death ray. Then the storm did something odd. The 2. Just as quickly, it was obscured by rain. None of the chasers saw it accelerate, expand, and suddenly zag northeast. Half a mile to the west, on the shoulder of Highway 81, Weather Channel meteorologist Mike Bettes was just going live. In the footage from that day, you can see him examine the storm, glowing ice blue with hail, before suddenly having a frightening realization: Right there! There's the tornado! Hold on," Bettes yelled. The team's camera was ejected from the window but miraculously captured their Tornado Hunt vehicle tumbling through a field. Bettes's car was the second of three in the Weather Channel caravan, but the other two stayed on the road. At that point, Timmer and the Dominator were trying to get back in the chase. But just as they turned north, they plowed into a tangle of downed power lines. The driver gunned the engine in reverse, but the lines had hooked over a light bar and whipped the hood off the car like a slingshot. Their chase was over. They headed down Highway 81, where they encountered Bettes and Anderson surveying the damage. Anderson didn't realize it at the time, but as the car tumbled, he had fractured several vertebrae and ribs, along with his sternum. Once the tornado became obscured by rain, Hoadley and others abandoned the chase. Camille Seaman, a Shinnecock Indian, had seen an owl fly over their van, which, she told the group, meant someone was going to die. Wurman never got closer than two miles. But the scene across that part of Oklahoma was almost as scary as the twister itself. It was like one of these zombie apocalypse movies. People were banging on our windows, insisting that we tell them where the tornado was and how to get to safety. Farther west on I, state trooper Betsy Randolph was pulled off the road. The car was totaled by debris; the trooper survived. Local amateur chaser Richard "Pup" Henderson, 33, wasn't so lucky. A truck driver who'd followed tornadoes with a news crew on a few occasions, Henderson snapped a cell-phone photo of the twister that moments later would kill him. For months after the storm, there was speculation about what had happened to Samaras's team. But theories that Samaras was caught in a chaser traffic jam never panned out. I haven't met him but I have a positive view of him overall. He seems like a genuinely nice guy, and I admire the passion. He has taken what we all love and made a career of it and that's pretty remarkable. Other than that, he's a chaser just like the rest of us only with a brighter spotlight and a sturdier vehicle. John Olexa EF5. Dec 13, 60 11 60 La Plata, Maryland. Rob H said: It's strange because while Storm Chasers is probably a large factor in some of the negative things in this hobby,. Mar 1, 6, 21 48 Lansing, MI skywatch. I've not really seen much of any data he's collected published anywhere. A few years ago he said that his radar data would be published Still waiting The issue I have is that he watches radar from wherever and then when he sees a red pixel next to a green pixel a thousand miles away he tweets all about the big tornadoes coming. People take him seriously and then it gets spread faster than a cat picture. Warren Faidley EF5. May 7, 1, 21 Mos Isley Space Port www. Despite my strong disagreements with Timmer's chasing ethics, claims, behavior and how the current "face of chasing" reflects on the rest of us, he is a nice guy. The few times I've exchanged emails with him, including those following the death of Tim and crew, he was very kind and surprisingly professional. I also believe he contributes to severe weather awareness. If he'd drop the research, saving lives claims, etc He's also a sharp guy and it's too bad he does not devote the same promotional energy to actual research with a major institution. Jake Orosi EF4. Apr 14, 32 11 Alexandria, LA. I'm ambivalent about Reed Timmer. He likes weather, the way I do, and I hear he's personable; but I just can't really relate to him a whole lot. He's a celebrity. He does commercials for windshield wipers. He uses this big giant special vehicle and tries to get tornadoes to run over him. He's got a professional "rivalry" with another person like him. He makes a big deal of collecting data. Really, I'm just some guy with a truck who likes to watch storms; I don't find very much in common. The only difference between him and dozens of other chasers is that he has , followers on Facebook. You need to consider the following issues. Representatives of NWS have made it abundantly clear to Skywarn trainees, spotters, and chasers that the two quickest ways to get Wx observations to their mets is 1. Ham radio 2. Only the NWS mets have the knowledge, qualifications, and authority to decide if a watch or warning has to be issued. The bottom line? We're all human, and mistakes happen, so what occurred is just another 'live-and-learn' situation. Then, everyone can move on, put the incident in the past, and return to our common goal - serving the needs of the public to the best of everyone's ability. Fisherman, you're missing the main point here. We share the same goal and that is to ensure protection of life and property. An annual estimate will do. Perhaps this is a genuine, demonstrable problem and Lynn should've And we're still dodging the overall issue. If the conversation goes something like this: Thanks, but no thanks. It is still the same outcome, no? But if this is about not having to go to the "trouble" of having to vet occasional reports, surely a brief back-and-forth conversation is better than not having something reported at all. This is not about mutual exclusion - spotters OR chasers. This should be about BOTH. The more tools in the tool bag the better While I agree with Dj that Rick Smith may have given appeared to have given a kick in the pants to chasers even though they do in fact rely on them often, Derek Baker is correct. I've met with and worked with Rick for quite some time and he actually respects chasers that legitimately chase to assist in research and development as well as assisting in safety of life and property. His statement in an official capacity as with any NWS employees will always state that the practice of chasing is not condoned as liabilities exist if it's not stated. Now, in regards to using the deaths in May of as an example, well I do agree that it was in bad taste. You should never use this that truly assisted you as an example of a practice of which your chastising in an official capacity. In that aspect though, he may have been caught off guard and went to the most memorable loss of life within the chase community. You have to understand how the media plays mind games as they question you just to make a headline work in the most favorable manner for them as a journalist. They could care less about the true issues, they just want the story. I would definitely say that the ARES net seems to require an overhaul or retraining in that region though. This needs to be a live and learn issue. Learn from it, use what's learned and apply it to policy and move on with the added knowledge. Everyone should be working together to reach the ultimate goal Safety of life and property. Now, if your the Dj I think you are, I know you truly wouldn't without the data and research you guys do from anyone. Doing so doesn't affect the NWS or this ARES net, it only affects the people your doing the research for, the people we all wish to ensure remain safe Think about that. I need a new talk to type app! This 'respected chaser' has caused problems on the Closed Net in other years, multiple years. He was politely told the status and that the area he was in was NOT in our area, referred appropriately, and asked not to transmit on the closed net. He wouldn't let it go, kept pushing the issue, all of this while there was a tornado on the ground IN THE AREA and spotters who needed to speak with the NC, but couldn't because the chaser kept monopolizing the frequency with long, eloquently-worded soliloquies. His interference that year became a safety issue. He is lucky nobody was injured that day, as he could be liable for preventing the very emergency communication that he politely says he so desperately wants to be able to provide. We have a history with this 'respected chaser'. He already knows the status here, but seems to me to enjoy testing the waters every year to raise a stink, very politely always, repeated every storm season, right in the middle of our high-stress activation. We need to know the folks who check into our nets, we need to know that they can accurately describe the weather feature they see and interpret it, we need to know they can accurately describe the location of the weather feature, and aren't mistaken about what road they are on. We know the similar and confusing road names around here, and which roads with the same name don't go through in certain spots, or concurrently run into having a different name at some point. We know what building or company or landmark is in the path of the weather feature. We know the alternate escape routes that are NOT shown on the maps because we live here and travel these roads and keep up with construction. This man 'knows the Wichita Falls area [very well]' because he's 'been through here several times'. I'm sorry, that's not what we need on the Closed Net. And everyone with their panties in a wad over their perception of his supposed mistreatment, if you don't live here, if you don't enter the group and train and re-train and re-certify annually, and progress with a seasoned spotter until they sign off on your ability to correctly assess what you see, then you don't have a dog in this fight. We are disciplined for all the right reasons, and we are respected by the NWS as a highly trained and accurate source for weather reports. You don't get to fly the chopper till you show you can handle the similator. You don't get to drive at 60mph until you show you can handle the car at You don't get to enter the gated community if you don't have clearance. And you don't get to give willy nilly 'reports' on the Closed Net here until you are approved by the trained and experienced leadership of the Net Controls and the County Emergency Management group. And if this man is such a great friend of Rick Smith, maybe he should get Rick to write him a personal letter of recommendation and send it to the ARES Coordinator, requesting to accept his reports. Funny, he does this every year, and yet no letter from Rick supporting him. What if I see severe weather? Can I check in then? What if I see a car overturned in the ditch? What if I see an armadillo born dead on the side of the road, can I check in then? I'm reminded of someone raising a stink, not because they really want Company A to make their wedding cake, but because they want Company A to refuse Oh well, like other things, everyone has an opinion. Some are based on misperception, and others are based on the complete story. Many other spotter nets around the Plains and Midwest are not closed, and they apparently do just fine. The Norman, OK net, which the spotter in question was coming from when he attempted to hand-off to Wichita Falls, is in the most chaser-dense metro area in the world, yet we don't see them complaining about errant chasers. While I recognize the right of an operator to close their net, I question the reason why it is necessary and how it furthers the mission of the net in the first place. Can someone offer some insight? Because the whole story is about a chaser wacting to check in to a net that is closed. Closed nets are not closed to keep out chasers. Thats just dumb. Closed nets are closed to keep out false reporting from unknown people. Emergency traffic is and will always be allowed on closed nets. Someone just got their feelings hurt and saying stuff that just does or will not happen. In this case it's just that simple. This chaser records everything he does and archives them also. It is people like you that should not be allowed to comment on articles like this, because you do nothing but lie. Remember, this is just my opinion. Would I be allowed to make a report then? What if I had to call out for station in distress? Would I be told to go to a different frequency? You see, that's my problem and that has the potential to get someone hurt. Dang get that through you thick skulls. Well established nets do follow FCC rules with regard to that. That is not what is in question here. The mp3 file recording of the second chaser making a transmittion and not identify his station. A metallic voice boomed: I took a few steps toward the already packed restroom shelters, contemplated the irony of having never encountered a tornado until this moment, and then ran for the exit. Overhead was a swirling column of dust rising from the tarmac to the heavens. It was a beautiful LP that's low-precipitation EF-0 tornado that Timmer, looking at my photo after he'd pulled up in the armored Dominator 3, told me would have condensed into a funnel cloud if the humidity had been a bit higher. Timmer, who's based in Norman, is a boyish and engaging 33, with close-cropped brown hair perennially crammed under a backward baseball cap. For roughly six years, he says, he's been working on his Ph. According to his memoir, Into the Storm , he got his big break chasing the killer Moore, Oklahoma, tornado on foot while offering color commentary. Like most chasers, Timmer can recall the date, location, and EF rating of just about every tornado he's ever seen. Chasers don't talk about seeing tornadoes so much as "getting" them, which is to say possessing them like a Grateful Dead ticket stub or memorable summit photo. Or rather we "blasted" north, in the parlance of chaser lingo, tracking a low-pressure trough that was supposed to move across Montana and North Dakota. The Dominator, with its angular matte black exterior, looks like the offspring of a monster truck and the Batmobile. At every gas station crowds mobbed Timmer, asking the same series of questions, to which he always enthusiastically answered: It soon became clear that chasing, in its essence, is a long drive with an indeterminate destination and terrible food. Racing across America's breadbasket, it's nearly impossible to purchase anything that has grown out of the ground. About the only similarity with Everest is the risk of blood clots, in this case from sitting for so long rather than from the blood-thickening effects of altitude. Several of Timmer's crew joke that they can feel them forming. The Dominator team sleeps only in fair weather. They empty Gatorade jugs—and then refill them instead of stopping to relieve themselves. They talk about the weather. As he stepped out of the truck, he uncovered something smashed beneath his jeans. Timmer, like Wurman and Samaras before he died , is working on tornadogenesis, though his efforts have a decidedly more homespun feel. Instead of the million-dollar Doppler-radar trucks that Wurman uses, or the steel turtle probes Samaras designed, Timmer attempts to get his weather sensors into tornados via delivery systems that seem like schemes to escape Gilligan's Island. Though he initially had success deploying parachute probes with a foot fixed-wing drone, the FAA grounded him. Now, in the back of the Dominator, there was a busted model rocket of the hobby-store variety. In a box sat half a dozen "stake probes," which consist of weather sensors and GPS pet trackers mounted to barbed half-inch-steel pickets. Finally, there was a potato gun, which can fire a parachute probe up into a tornado's circulation. Or a hole in the rear window of the Yukon, as it had done a few weeks back. He'd been chasing nearly nonstop for three months, and the death of his colleague was weighing on him. He'd been thinking more about his parents back in Michigan. Timmer's current fixation is suction vortices, those microfunnels that, as in El Reno, peel off from the main tornado and last for only a fraction of a second. Because they spin within the main rotation, vortices carry the mother tornado's power but also add their own. Getting hit by one might be like getting smacked with a baseball bat wielded by somebody zooming by on a freight train. Suction vortices would also explain why Samaras's Cobalt was flung a quarter-mile while other vehicles inside El Reno's circulation were merely pelted with debris. After driving 3, miles in four days, we finally caught up with a cell that had "a good spin on it," near the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in western South Dakota. As we got closer, other cars with cameras and wind-speed-measuring anemometers bolted onto them materialized out of the traffic like members of a secret society. But just as quickly, the cell went "outflow dominant," dumping energy in the form of rain and wind instead of sucking air up. On that empty Badlands road with post-storm easterlies whipping by, McRorey finally said the thing that seems so painfully obvious to an outsider watching tornado hunters in their element. On my final day with team Dominator, a cell in southeastern Wyoming finally produced a fleeting spin-up. Naturally, we were parked directly underneath the rotating wall cloud, which hung just a few hundred feet over our heads—a feature often called the bear's cage because the rain falls in a tight circle around a dry center, and because that's where the tornado tends to form. Todd Dalley, a pipe fitter and mechanical savant from Michigan, was aiming to get a probe into the circulation on the back of a radio-controlled quadcopter. With cameras rolling, the machine took off and briefly soared into the swirling sky. Then it did exactly what you'd expect a tiny helicopter to do in a tornado. It crashed. Everybody realizes that they can't all be "doing science," though few will actually cop to it. But Timmer and several other ego chasers, as they get labeled, make a good lightning rod. When I asked Wurman whether he considers Timmer a lightweight, his reply was blunt: I mean, really, he's not a tornado scientist. In the hierarchy of stormchasers, serious scientists with grant funding form the in-crowd. These are Ph. Even Samaras, whose grants came from National Geographic instead of the National Science Foundation, apparently wasn't in their league. He was also an engineer," explains Wurman. Part of the guff is no doubt that reporters glom on to the most charismatic guys with the craziest footage. But here's another theory that has more to do with tornado science itself: The biggest came in , near Champaign, Illinois, when a radar engineer named Donald Staggs happened to notice an odd trailing elephant-trunk shape hooking downward on his screen about the time when a tornado was reported in a passing thunderstorm. I know that he has launched or attempted at times various probes that I really have no idea how successful they were or weren't. My point was that in trying different probes and experimenting, he may not have gotten or may have useful data, but by trial and error he just might come up with one that consistently produces results and changes what we know about tornados. As far as being on TV, he does do some in station interviews, but I was mostly referring to the live reporting he does during chases with various channels via cell phone. Then post the data if it really exists. Since he hasn't, yet that was the sole stated purpose for collecting data, When is he on TV? I should be doing pictures and videos on this week off I have for medical leave He was doing live reports through last year's major tornado days in the OKC area, but so far this year they haven't had much around the city. So a few people keep bringing up the data contribution thing. And it's an interesting point. It seems to be that the most misunderstood portion of a tornado other than why some mesocyclones produce them and some don't , is the lower portion near ground level. I remember him attaching a radar pointing in the vertical along with all of his other instrumentation. I was pretty sure that he had a solid intercept with that setup. So I'm confused as to why that data isn't being talked about? It seems like a data set that would be extremely valuable. Recently I remember reading that he had one of his parachute probes suspended in the Coleridge, NE tornado for a substantial amount of time. Usually, those probes of his just went up a few feet and then crashed into a nearby field I imagine it takes quite a bit of time to process and makes sense of the data gathered? Maybe this is why we haven't heard much from Reeds data research? I don't know how much time it takes, just guessing. It doesn't take this long Comparing the size of his dish versus the real mobile radars, it's more likely that this was a publicity stunt as part of the show versus actual research. Plus as I recall his Master's is in climate research, so I'm not sure he would have spare time to do formal research on tornado data. Guess we'll never know if it was a publicity stunt or not, but if so I don't know, kind of changes my perception of him since I thought I've heard him say over and over, how it's all about the science. And I have no problem if it isn't "all about the science" with Reed. Just saying, "I love storms and love chasing them like the rest of you guys" would be perfectly fine too. Totally cool with me. Plenty of us are that way. I sure am. Maybe that's what the speakers at ChaserCon were getting at. That he seems like more of a publicity stunt at times? Tim Samaras actually seemed to genuinely love taking it all in from a non scientific standpoint as well..

Let em trust their Skywarn noob's. Due to Ricks comments, after using chasers for free live streaming, for free data and research that they HAVE benefitted from, they can kiss my rump Reed timmer asshole. Yes, many chasers have video of tornados touching down without a warning in place. Sometimes without a watch in place much less a warning. WE call those in. I guess they forgot that we have more technology now than ever before.

I guess they forget we can easily show the public the live streams and videos of unwarned cells that drop tornados. Maybe we need to start Reed timmer asshole people how much the NWS screws up.

More info them on blast since they just seem to love putting chasers on blast. Why bother with HAM? Submit your Reed timmer asshole to or the NWS. Your description of the chaser is accurate, and I join you in sharing my complete trust in his laudable skills, admirable motivations, and professional conduct.

Opinions regarding Reed Timmer from within the chaser community?

Second, while I totally understand your frustration, I think you need to put yourself in Rick's position. Any time Rick is communicating as an employee of the NWS, he must be extremely mindful of the legal implications of what he says.

If Rick is seen Reed timmer asshole condone, Reed timmer asshole, or encourage storm chasing, and someone gets killed while storm chasing, he could be held liable, get his arse sued, and lose his job. So under no circumstances will we ever see Rick officially condone go here chasing or encourage members of the public to storm chase in order to make Wx observations and send in reports. But what about Skywarn Spotters? How is it that Rick can praise their work?

Consequently, the NWS is being consistent with its mandate re: Contrast that with Storm Chasing, which can involve a Reed timmer asshole range of unofficial activities that include some very risky activities.

What gave Rick's quote a more controversial tone was not Rick's words, but the context within which it was used by the author of the newspaper article. All said, as always, 'with Reed timmer asshole respect' Apologies for the typo.

Shamita nude Watch SEX Videos Naats Video. Chasers don't talk about seeing tornadoes so much as "getting" them, which is to say possessing them like a Grateful Dead ticket stub or memorable summit photo. Or rather we "blasted" north, in the parlance of chaser lingo, tracking a low-pressure trough that was supposed to move across Montana and North Dakota. The Dominator, with its angular matte black exterior, looks like the offspring of a monster truck and the Batmobile. At every gas station crowds mobbed Timmer, asking the same series of questions, to which he always enthusiastically answered: It soon became clear that chasing, in its essence, is a long drive with an indeterminate destination and terrible food. Racing across America's breadbasket, it's nearly impossible to purchase anything that has grown out of the ground. About the only similarity with Everest is the risk of blood clots, in this case from sitting for so long rather than from the blood-thickening effects of altitude. Several of Timmer's crew joke that they can feel them forming. The Dominator team sleeps only in fair weather. They empty Gatorade jugs—and then refill them instead of stopping to relieve themselves. They talk about the weather. As he stepped out of the truck, he uncovered something smashed beneath his jeans. Timmer, like Wurman and Samaras before he died , is working on tornadogenesis, though his efforts have a decidedly more homespun feel. Instead of the million-dollar Doppler-radar trucks that Wurman uses, or the steel turtle probes Samaras designed, Timmer attempts to get his weather sensors into tornados via delivery systems that seem like schemes to escape Gilligan's Island. Though he initially had success deploying parachute probes with a foot fixed-wing drone, the FAA grounded him. Now, in the back of the Dominator, there was a busted model rocket of the hobby-store variety. In a box sat half a dozen "stake probes," which consist of weather sensors and GPS pet trackers mounted to barbed half-inch-steel pickets. Finally, there was a potato gun, which can fire a parachute probe up into a tornado's circulation. Or a hole in the rear window of the Yukon, as it had done a few weeks back. He'd been chasing nearly nonstop for three months, and the death of his colleague was weighing on him. He'd been thinking more about his parents back in Michigan. Timmer's current fixation is suction vortices, those microfunnels that, as in El Reno, peel off from the main tornado and last for only a fraction of a second. Because they spin within the main rotation, vortices carry the mother tornado's power but also add their own. Getting hit by one might be like getting smacked with a baseball bat wielded by somebody zooming by on a freight train. Suction vortices would also explain why Samaras's Cobalt was flung a quarter-mile while other vehicles inside El Reno's circulation were merely pelted with debris. After driving 3, miles in four days, we finally caught up with a cell that had "a good spin on it," near the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in western South Dakota. As we got closer, other cars with cameras and wind-speed-measuring anemometers bolted onto them materialized out of the traffic like members of a secret society. But just as quickly, the cell went "outflow dominant," dumping energy in the form of rain and wind instead of sucking air up. On that empty Badlands road with post-storm easterlies whipping by, McRorey finally said the thing that seems so painfully obvious to an outsider watching tornado hunters in their element. On my final day with team Dominator, a cell in southeastern Wyoming finally produced a fleeting spin-up. Naturally, we were parked directly underneath the rotating wall cloud, which hung just a few hundred feet over our heads—a feature often called the bear's cage because the rain falls in a tight circle around a dry center, and because that's where the tornado tends to form. Todd Dalley, a pipe fitter and mechanical savant from Michigan, was aiming to get a probe into the circulation on the back of a radio-controlled quadcopter. With cameras rolling, the machine took off and briefly soared into the swirling sky. Then it did exactly what you'd expect a tiny helicopter to do in a tornado. It crashed. Everybody realizes that they can't all be "doing science," though few will actually cop to it. But Timmer and several other ego chasers, as they get labeled, make a good lightning rod. When I asked Wurman whether he considers Timmer a lightweight, his reply was blunt: I mean, really, he's not a tornado scientist. In the hierarchy of stormchasers, serious scientists with grant funding form the in-crowd. These are Ph. Even Samaras, whose grants came from National Geographic instead of the National Science Foundation, apparently wasn't in their league. He was also an engineer," explains Wurman. Part of the guff is no doubt that reporters glom on to the most charismatic guys with the craziest footage. But here's another theory that has more to do with tornado science itself: But not everyone was fleeing: Up to stormchasers, including cell-phone-camera-wielding Okies, local news crews, National Science Foundation —funded researchers, hobbyists, enthusiasts, photographers, vanloads of storm tour groups, and field trips from at least four universities, were on the hunt. They were lined up like fans outside a rock concert on the southeast side of the storm, near Union City, but that was nothing compared with the rush-hour traffic streaming out of Oklahoma City. Reed Timmer, 33, costar of the Discovery Channel show Storm Chasers , stopped with his team in one of their custom armored Dominator vehicles to check on Bettes and company. The Dominator's steel hood had been ripped off by a downed power line. A few minutes later, Deputy Gerten headed half a mile north and then a mile west from his property, still in open country. Just off 10th Street, 40 yards out in a debris-strewn canola field, something caught his eye. A car? Gerten radioed his dispatcher, waited for the storm's hail core to pass, and waded into the matted stalks. Three of the car's wheels had been torn away completely, but the fourth bore a Chevy emblem. It was a Cobalt, the sort of midsize sedan you might find on an airport rental lot. Inside, the seats were folded back, "like you'd take a nap," Gerten says, and a single body was belted, facedown and shirtless, in the passenger seat. The man's shoes and one sock were missing. The driver's-side seat belt was still buckled, but the chair was empty. The man in the passenger seat was Tim Samaras, an engineer, Timmer's Storm Chasers costar, and coauthor of the memoir Tornado Hunter: At 55, he had been among the most respected storm-chasers. He'd been bitten by the weather bug early; his brother Jim credits The Wizard of Oz for sparking Tim's tornadophilia. Samaras had been hoping to deploy weather probes into the storm with his year-old son, Paul, a videographer, and meteorologist Carl Young. Samaras's research company, Twistex, based out of Bennett, Colorado, just east of Denver, used a small fleet of Chevy Cobalts and larger trucks to gather data and shoot storm photos and video. Gerten's radio sounded. It was Young. He'd been sucked from under the driver's-side seat belt and deposited in a rain-swollen right-of-way ditch a half-mile west of the car. The receding floodwater soon revealed Paul Samaras's body another 60 feet west of Young. That's both because so many of the chase community's notable figures were caught up in the throng and because it was the first time a twister had ever culled their ranks. It was also an uncommon meteorological beast. The tornado was what's called a multiple-vortex mesocyclone—a giant rotating cloud filled with faster-spinning vortices. EF refers to the Enhanced Fujita rating scale, which ballparks tornado damage from 0 to 5, with 0 being a nuisance and 5 being catastrophic; the May 20 Moore tornado was an EF The rating puzzled many who left messages on the online forum of the chaser publication Storm Track magazine. Some reported seeing small funnels dancing out of the storm base; others had observed a slowly turning ground scraper. They were all correct. In September, to confuse things further, they bumped it back down to EF-3, because the largely rural area sustained little actual property damage. Even as an EF-3, though, El Reno was off the charts, confounding the basic funnel taxonomy of stovepipes, elephant trunks, and wedges. As with word of the storm's true scale, news of the Twistex deaths also took a few days to reach the chaser community. When the tragedy was confirmed that Sunday, a narrative quickly emerged that Samaras was safety conscious and conservative. Timmer, his Storm Chasers costar, praised him as "a pioneer of science and a hero" who died to save others. Like many researchers, Samaras had been attempting to solve the mystery of tornado-genesis—how and why violent tornadoes form—a topic that, after 60 years of study, still isn't well understood. Samaras, said Timmer, was "doing it for the science. That's because storm-chasing has gotten very popular lately, and El Reno exposed some of its growing pains. The clearest picture of the trouble came from a weather geek out of Denver, Eric Carlson, who made an animation of a road map overlaid with the El Reno tornado and roughly chase vehicles broadcasting their locations via the popular Spotter Network service. The video looks like an Atari rendering of Pamplona, with little blue arrows scattering to get out of the way of a stampeding white bull. While no hard data exists on the number of stormchasers in the U. The NWS's SkyWarn program has some , volunteer spotters who report observations of severe weather. Meanwhile, according to founder Tyler Allison, the nonprofit Spotter Network claims roughly 37, "highly engaged spotters" who will deploy when there's a good storm in the neighborhood. Probably only of these are what Allison calls actual chasers, people "willing to drive hundreds if not thousands of miles a year" in search of tornadoes. These diehards begin each spring on the southern plains, where tornado season peaks in May. Accessibility help. Email or Phone Password Forgotten account? Info and ads. See more of Northern Plains Chasers on Facebook. Log In. Forgotten account? Not Now. Community See all. About See all. So I'm confused as to why that data isn't being talked about? It seems like a data set that would be extremely valuable. Recently I remember reading that he had one of his parachute probes suspended in the Coleridge, NE tornado for a substantial amount of time. Usually, those probes of his just went up a few feet and then crashed into a nearby field I imagine it takes quite a bit of time to process and makes sense of the data gathered? Maybe this is why we haven't heard much from Reeds data research? I don't know how much time it takes, just guessing. It doesn't take this long Comparing the size of his dish versus the real mobile radars, it's more likely that this was a publicity stunt as part of the show versus actual research. Plus as I recall his Master's is in climate research, so I'm not sure he would have spare time to do formal research on tornado data. Guess we'll never know if it was a publicity stunt or not, but if so I don't know, kind of changes my perception of him since I thought I've heard him say over and over, how it's all about the science. And I have no problem if it isn't "all about the science" with Reed. Just saying, "I love storms and love chasing them like the rest of you guys" would be perfectly fine too. Totally cool with me. Plenty of us are that way. I sure am. Maybe that's what the speakers at ChaserCon were getting at. That he seems like more of a publicity stunt at times? Tim Samaras actually seemed to genuinely love taking it all in from a non scientific standpoint as well. John Bowles EF0. Oct 19, 31 5 11 Southern Wisconsin. It doesn't really matter what data he is or isn't collecting if he isn't publishing it. Researchers can't do anything with data they aren't given. You must log in or register to reply here. Top Bottom. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register. After realizing the truth I went to his house and personally apologized for things I had said publicly. He was friendly as can be. I've seen him while chasing several times but was always too rude to talk cause of my personal ignorance. He's drove 4 hours one way just to help us with charity events and offers to help our station from time to time if needed while in the area. I'm a little hesitant about the science aspect but I respect almost any chaser that puts in the time he does chasing, so he's up there on my list as most respected. Robert Edmonds EF5. Jun 19, 3 6 New Mexico. He is a nice guy the few times we have crossed paths. At the same time it is not throwing him under the bus to say he has not contributed as much to tornado science as many other scientists focused on that area of study. Todd Lemery EF4. Jun 2, 21 53 Menominee, MI. Without having ever met him personally, no one has posted that he is a jerk or anything. Seems to me that the overall impression from the postings is that he is a genuinely down to earth nice guy. Reed actually makes an effort to collect data, although none may have resulted in any breakthroughs, that doesn't mean it was a waste of time or that there won't be any revelations coming in the future. It takes time to figure out a better way to do things. The area where he probably shines the most is raising awareness of storms events. Quite honestly, when Reed is on TV telling people to be on their toes, they tend to pay attention to him more than the average guy. As far as worrying about him unintentionally encouraging others to get themselves in dangerous spots, I can see where that criticism comes from ,but people have to take responsibility for their own actions. If not, you should blame Darwin more than Reed. Hi Dale, good question on the actual data. I honestly don't know what kind of success he's had retrieving data. I know that he has launched or attempted at times various probes that I really have no idea how successful they were or weren't. My point was that in trying different probes and experimenting, he may not have gotten or may have useful data, but by trial and error he just might come up with one that consistently produces results and changes what we know about tornados. As far as being on TV, he does do some in station interviews, but I was mostly referring to the live reporting he does during chases with various channels via cell phone. Then post the data if it really exists. Since he hasn't, yet that was the sole stated purpose for collecting data, He wouldn't let it go, kept pushing the issue, all of this while there was a tornado on the ground IN THE AREA and spotters who needed to speak with the NC, but couldn't because the chaser kept monopolizing the frequency with long, eloquently-worded soliloquies. His interference that year became a safety issue. He is lucky nobody was injured that day, as he could be liable for preventing the very emergency communication that he politely says he so desperately wants to be able to provide. We have a history with this 'respected chaser'. He already knows the status here, but seems to me to enjoy testing the waters every year to raise a stink, very politely always, repeated every storm season, right in the middle of our high-stress activation. We need to know the folks who check into our nets, we need to know that they can accurately describe the weather feature they see and interpret it, we need to know they can accurately describe the location of the weather feature, and aren't mistaken about what road they are on. We know the similar and confusing road names around here, and which roads with the same name don't go through in certain spots, or concurrently run into having a different name at some point. We know what building or company or landmark is in the path of the weather feature. We know the alternate escape routes that are NOT shown on the maps because we live here and travel these roads and keep up with construction. This man 'knows the Wichita Falls area [very well]' because he's 'been through here several times'. I'm sorry, that's not what we need on the Closed Net. And everyone with their panties in a wad over their perception of his supposed mistreatment, if you don't live here, if you don't enter the group and train and re-train and re-certify annually, and progress with a seasoned spotter until they sign off on your ability to correctly assess what you see, then you don't have a dog in this fight. We are disciplined for all the right reasons, and we are respected by the NWS as a highly trained and accurate source for weather reports. You don't get to fly the chopper till you show you can handle the similator. You don't get to drive at 60mph until you show you can handle the car at You don't get to enter the gated community if you don't have clearance. And you don't get to give willy nilly 'reports' on the Closed Net here until you are approved by the trained and experienced leadership of the Net Controls and the County Emergency Management group. And if this man is such a great friend of Rick Smith, maybe he should get Rick to write him a personal letter of recommendation and send it to the ARES Coordinator, requesting to accept his reports. Funny, he does this every year, and yet no letter from Rick supporting him. What if I see severe weather? Can I check in then? What if I see a car overturned in the ditch? What if I see an armadillo born dead on the side of the road, can I check in then? I'm reminded of someone raising a stink, not because they really want Company A to make their wedding cake, but because they want Company A to refuse Oh well, like other things, everyone has an opinion. Some are based on misperception, and others are based on the complete story. Many other spotter nets around the Plains and Midwest are not closed, and they apparently do just fine. The Norman, OK net, which the spotter in question was coming from when he attempted to hand-off to Wichita Falls, is in the most chaser-dense metro area in the world, yet we don't see them complaining about errant chasers. While I recognize the right of an operator to close their net, I question the reason why it is necessary and how it furthers the mission of the net in the first place. Can someone offer some insight? Because the whole story is about a chaser wacting to check in to a net that is closed. Closed nets are not closed to keep out chasers. Thats just dumb. Closed nets are closed to keep out false reporting from unknown people. Emergency traffic is and will always be allowed on closed nets. Someone just got their feelings hurt and saying stuff that just does or will not happen. In this case it's just that simple. This chaser records everything he does and archives them also. It is people like you that should not be allowed to comment on articles like this, because you do nothing but lie. Remember, this is just my opinion. Would I be allowed to make a report then? What if I had to call out for station in distress? Would I be told to go to a different frequency? You see, that's my problem and that has the potential to get someone hurt. Dang get that through you thick skulls. Well established nets do follow FCC rules with regard to that. That is not what is in question here. The mp3 file recording of the second chaser making a transmittion and not identify his station. That does not cast a good shadow for the whole argument of the story. Not the newspaper story. Given my comments on this forum, it should not come as a surprise that the Australian chaser at the centre of this controversy is in the top 3 of my list. I don't think there is a storm chaser out there who will spend as much time forwarding observations to NWS offices via Ham radio as this chap. FYI, I have never ever heard him engage in the sort of interactions you accuse him of. Instead, what stands out is how polite, professional, efficient, and cooperative he is when interacting via Ham radio. I would also suggest that if all the people who have interacted with the Australian storm chaser on Ham frequencies were polled, virtually all of them would have positive things to say about him. You are more than welcome to share evidence that he has been a problem in all the counties in all the states he has chased in, but I am betting that you won't be able to find any. Frankly, I do not think the Australian storm chaser is the source of the problem. Ego has everything to do with it because I go through the same thing. There are certain ways you conduct yourself. If this operator was wrong he was wrong but if it is an emergency situation you have to look at it. We are in a hobby. How does one get into a closed Skywarn net in the first place? Do you all have some magical method for acquiring spotters in the field that we here in Colorado aren't familiar with? I guess we're still using the archaic method of standing up a net and taking check ins from spotters who then move to areas they can get a good safe vantage point on the storm and from there they report if they have weather that meets the requested NWS criteria. As our storms move through the district more and more spotters may check into the net and move to get a good bead on what the storm is doing. So, at some point do you just cut off the check ins and say a Skywarn net is closed and no one else can play in your sandbox? Our MOUs with the repeater clubs that own the repeaters we use are gracious enough to allow us to request exclusive use of the repeater for the duration of the net such that rag chewing is not permitted and the hams just move off to another repeater or simplex for that. I think rather than kick the guy to the curb the net control should have taken his check in, specified what he would like to hear in the way of severe weather reports from the man as he might not have been aware of the requirement and then trusted that the man would want to help out and do the right thing. After all, this gig is about public safety and not territories or who owns the sandbox. Ever driven in a state other than the one that issued your license? Bad example bud!.

That's right Leave my Storm Alone!! He also was NOT trying to make a severe weather report. There is procedures in place to make emergency transmissions on ham radio frequencies and being a seasoned ham operator he knows those procedures.

He is not intitled to check in to a closed net just because he wants to. If he has an emergency then that a different thing all together. You also can hear on the mp3 file another chaser not following established rules set but the FCC on making illegal transmissions by not identifying him self after his unneeded comment.

He probably does not even have a Reed timmer asshole to transmit on that frequency anyway. Another example of disregarding the rules and regs. The head line of the whole story is in essence the problem with open nets. But a closed net weeds out those kind of reports. The Net control operator does not have to figure out if that report is true or made up. Just report Reed timmer asshole facts nothing else just how it happened and exactly what you see.

WOW sounds so fimiliar??? In other words they are their own albatross. I sincerely hope there is an Reed timmer asshole to retrain the Wichita Falls ARES group and make them something usable instead of the seriously untrained group that's there now. You being a meteorologist know you can not go by just one source of data.

No lives are Reed timmer asshole put in any danger because of closed severe weather nets. But lives can be put in danger during the time the net control operator is trying to sort out if a report from an unknown source is true or not. Timely warning as you know save lives. The NWS has to do that all the time. They have to put a forecaster on that task of trying to Reed timmer asshole if Reed timmer asshole reports coming in from unknown sources are true. Closed Nets take care of that problem.

Most chasers are read article of Spotter Network. It goes directly to NWS!!! Visit web page whole thing in this case is Reed timmer asshole a very small Reed timmer asshole of chasers mad about being told "Thanks but no thanks" No lives are in danger of not being told of severe weather threats.

That's just hear say to add to the ill feelings of the chasers in question. It's just a closed severe weather net and move on. By the way I thank you for your time and work you have put in studying weather. We have a lot of work to do. Both in weather forecasting and Reed timmer asshole warning dissemination. Because That is what saves lives!!!

When the Luck Ran Out in El Reno

You need to consider the following issues. Representatives of NWS have made it abundantly clear to Skywarn trainees, spotters, and chasers that the two quickest ways to get Wx observations to their mets is 1.

Ham radio 2. Only the NWS mets have the knowledge, qualifications, and authority to decide if a watch or warning has to be issued. The bottom line?

We're all human, and mistakes happen, so what occurred is just another 'live-and-learn' situation. Then, everyone can move on, put the incident in the past, and return to our common goal - serving the needs Reed timmer asshole the public to the best of everyone's ability. Fisherman, you're Reed timmer asshole the main point Reed timmer asshole. We share the same goal and that is to ensure protection check this out life and property.

An annual estimate will do. Perhaps this is a genuine, demonstrable problem and Lynn should've And we're still dodging the overall issue. If the conversation goes something like this: Blonde transgender masturbate cock and squirt.

Related Movies

Next Page
Age Verification
The content accessible from this site contains pornography and is intended for adults only.
Age Verification
The content accessible from this site contains pornography and is intended for adults only.
Age Verification
The content accessible from this site contains pornography and is intended for adults only.
Age Verification
The content accessible from this site contains pornography and is intended for adults only.
Age Verification
The content accessible from this site contains pornography and is intended for adults only.